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Adult ADHD Videos

Is attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) a gift or a disability? There is much debate about this topic. People feel very strongly about this ADHD issue, perhaps because the question is tied to our identity. In my opinion, there is no easy answer, and it very much depends on the circumstances. 
Starting a new job with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be particularly difficult. If you have ADHD, remind yourself that this is a big change, which is both exciting and challenging for someone with ADHD. Below is a video with a few questions you might want to ask your employer before you get started at your new job with ADHD.
People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to struggle with transitions from one situation to another or one activity to another. Whether you have ADHD or not, even good change creates stress. Change is the definition of moving out of one’s comfort zone and it takes a lot of energy to react to the unknown. For people with ADHD, that discomfort is magnified. ADHD makes transitions much more challenging for people.
I think it was Jessica McCabe of "How to ADHD" who referred to herself, someone with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as an ADHD late bloomer. I have found numerous forums where ADHDers wonder whether (or assert that) they are late bloomers. There are several reasons why people with ADHD might be considered late bloomers and there are reasons why being an ADHD late bloomer is not such a terrible thing.
Finding a balance between busyness and idleness is hard for those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Some with ADHD keep their active brains too busy, sometimes resulting in burnout. Other ADHDers find it difficult to accomplish anything and consider themselves to be lazy underachievers. Many with the condition swing between both, overachieving one minute and dropping the ball the next. I would like to talk about why we struggle with this juggling act and what steps to take when finding a balance in our lives with ADHD. 
Writing with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) poses a challenge to both children and adults living with the disorder. Many with ADHD struggle with dysgraphia, a learning disorder that makes writing difficult on several levels. Problems range from the physical act of writing to organizing essays. After discussing ADHD and creativity in my last post, I wanted to go into more depth about why writing with ADHD can be so hard and what we can do about it.
Because obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are so different in theory, some doctors argue that they cannot occur together. However, they have a surprisingly high rate of comorbidity, which is when two medical conditions appear together, and many with ADHD report obsessive thoughts and behaviors. Continuing my series of posts about ADHD and comorbid conditions, I would like to discuss the similarities, differences, and possible treatments for OCD and ADHD.
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects working memory as well as short- and long-term memory. In fact, poor memory is often listed as a symptom of ADHD, and numerous articles give great advice about dealing with ADHD forgetfulness and how to improve one’s memory. However, I and many others with ADHD can accurately remember certain facts or conversations years later. I’d like to discuss how ADHD’s relationship to working memory impacts our daily lives, why we struggle with memory, and what we can do about it.
I love getting new books, but attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) makes reading difficult. Discovering what is between book covers is a wonderful experience. However, finishing those books is a different issue. As is often the case for people with ADHD, I have difficulties with follow-through on things, and that includes reading; other people with ADHD find reading difficult for other reasons.
My name is Noelle Matteson, and I will be writing for HealthyPlace’s blog Living with Adult ADHD. I am at the beginning of my attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) journey, so I thought this would be a good place to share my experiences and to learn about yours.