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Depression triggers come at unexpected times. We need to have quick and simple methods prepared in order to cope with these triggers in a healthy way. When I find myself suddenly faced with a depression trigger, I use the following methods to help me cope.
Almost every time I hear schizoaffective voices, I blame myself for hearing them. I know this doesn’t make sense, and I’m not being fair to myself. It also adds an element of guilt to an already difficult situation.
You may have heard that mindfulness calms anxiety. Sometimes, this can be hard to believe because mindfulness can seem like a trend, like just another passing fad that will soon be replaced by the next craze. Mindfulness has been a part of the human experience for thousands of years, so it has long surpassed "trend" status and has established itself as an integral part of wellbeing. Because mindfulness becomes something you do and a way that you are, you can embrace it and, by engaging in mindfulness, you can calm anxiety. 
Have the attitudes and conversations around female body image shifted in the era of #MeToo? Is this movement helping to reinforce how bodies should be viewed and talked about? Has it encouraged women to love, accept, and embrace their own bodies, as opposed to self-deprecation and shame? Will positive changes take root, so that female body image is less distorted in the era of #MeToo?
The arts have played an integral part in my recovery from schizoaffective disorder. It all started with a five-week stay at a treatment center where I received my initial diagnosis. There was a lot of downtime at the center and I was frequently digging through their stash of art supplies. I had frightening visual hallucinations, and found it very therapeutic to draw them. When others could see what I saw, my hallucinations lost their power over me and I felt less isolated. A few drawings and painting turned into many which then turned into a more serious pursuit. Over the next several years I participated in group and solo art shows all across North America. Recovery is full of surprises, and my life was taken in a direction I would have never expected prior to my admission to the treatment center, the place where my recovery journey began.
When online, I generally avoid political discussions. Because so many of them are so prone to devolve into toxic shouting matches, I find it healthier to stay away. Today, however, I’m diving in headfirst. The country is still reeling in the aftermath of the shootings in El Paso and Dayton, and quite frankly, I’m pissed off. Once again, a certain segment of the population is refusing to budge on any meaningful discussion concerning gun control, and I’m just sick of it. If we don’t have meaningful action on gun control, this country is going to drown in anxiety.
After two instances of sexual abuse, I felt that my sexuality no longer belonged to me. Twice my body was treated as an object to be used by my abusers as they saw fit, first during my childhood at the hands of a family member, then later by a stranger on a train. Though I didn't realize it at the time, I accepted that my sexuality belonged to the men who I slept with and not to me. It took me a long time to confront this truth, and I still haven't deconstructed the many ways that these instances of abuse eventually brought me to my experiences with sex now. I decided to use this blog as a place to explore this. 
When you go away to college for the first time, it can be overwhelming. You might not know many people going to your school, and you won’t know what to expect from classes. Some people drop out of college due to anxiety. Luckily, there are many ways to get through anxiety and excel during the first month of school. Read this article to learn more.
Depression is a common symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). After someone goes through a traumatic experience, it's normal to feel sorrow, confusion, and anger--all of which can manifest into depression.

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Laura Barton
Hi Connie. That's a great question. You're absolutely right, one of the ways stigma works is by silencing discussion of mental illness by presenting it in such a negative light that people are afraid to open up. While romanticizing mental illness does facilitate the conversation, it paints an unrealistic image of what mental illness is. When romanticized, it's typically shown as this idealistic form of the illness that's neat and easier to understand and manage, but mental illness is messy. It's not always going to look like tears streaming down cheeks or a romantic hero struggling with what's going on in his or her mind. Such a narrow view of mental illness can contribute to stigma and silence people because they feel like they don't fit in that box. In addition, others can feel like the person with mental illness should fit in that box, and when they don't, they're accused of faking or embellishing their illness. I hope that helps clear up my views on this a bit more.

In case you haven't come across them, here are a couple of blogs I've written on this topic:

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/survivingmentalhealthstigma/2015/11/romanticizing-mental-illnesses-feeds-mental-health-stigma

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/survivingmentalhealthstigma/2019/3/stop-romanticizing-suicide

I happy to chat about this more if you have other questions. :)
Nancy
Thank you for your post!!! I relate! Sorry to have your company in this challenge. Never give up hope! Feels better to hear from someone with same life challenges and heartbreak! Stay strong! We loving, caring parents do the best we know how despite judgement felt from others that don't know what it is like to be in our world. We feel judged by parents that don't understand our challenge because they have a much different experience caring for their children. It is out of our control. It is in God's plan and or up to the child to comply with treatment plan to help themselves. You so badly want to fix it for them, but you can't. It is not like an ear infection that gets better with bubble gum medicine in a day like you wish! All you can do is try your best with resources available and love them. If parents are tired of dealing with their issues then the children must feel more tired😪 Recovery is possible! I have seen it. It is not a straight road. It has curves, bumps and uturns. My son is 28 and doing fairly well now and very helpful to me. He is my best friend. I have another child that has also struggled in a different way. It can skip a generation. Going to have another glass of wine now. Best wishes to all that struggle. Praying for all that struggle every night!
George
I agree with Mark. Laziness is being without motivation to work, move, or use energy, whether due to mental illness or otherwise, but we do get that you are trying to make those of us who suffer from depression feel better. Please don't ignore that people with depression can also be lazy (your definition). It is important not to make these types of claims unless they are entirely true because a lot of us might end up tossing the whole thing into our "positive BS propaganda" pile and miss the truly helpful information you have provided. Thanks.
connie armstrong
hi I was just wondering whether you could explain more about how the romanticization of mental illnesss is creating a stigma. isn't it the oppisiste? stigma is something that is hush hush that people refuse to talk about isn't romanticising it making people talk about it more just in the wrong way?
Someadvice
Ok. Some bipolar episodes last awhile and communication during this time is futile. All you will get is being pushed away and angry responses. BUT, hang in there say caring words like I'm here, I'm not going anywhere, I care about you... something like that. You will probably get venom back because something takes over a person's mind and maybe they are so irritated they can't say anything nice. Doesn't make it ok but just put it out there and wait it out. She won't be able to make decisions right now. Keep checking in periodically and she my eventually come up for air. At this point treat her like a friend and when she's better you can talk to her normally again. I'm sorry to say but episodes can last for a few months, it's more like cycles and they can occur at certain times of the year, it's different for everyone but some people cycle in early spring and it lasts until may. Yeah and don't take any of it personally, it's not about you it's what is happening to her mind. It's more like a sickness, she could benefit from treatment and medication. I should also add there are different types of bipolar, in Bipolar I I've seen people start using drugs and become very sexually active and manic that way, bipolar II is more irritable, angry and depressed and stuff. If she's got bipolar I you may be in for some real trouble so watch her behavior and see what you are comfortable with. Everyone needs support.