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It's harder than it's ever been to be an individual. This week, I've been thinking a lot about The Fountainhead, a novel by Ayn Rand, the Russian-born American writer and thinker who's been largely slimed by 21st century progressives for her conservative political philosophy. The Fountainhead, however, deals not with politics but with self-hood. The story follows Howard Roark, an idiosyncratic architect who refuses to bend to the popular principles of his field. Time and time again, Roark is threatened with the end of his career if he doesn't bow to the preferences of the masses, and time and time again, he refuses to give in. Eventually, he comes out on top. The novel is, of course, fictional; reality might not have delivered success to Mr. Roark.
During my childhood, my dad was one of my best friends. So Father's Day was a very exciting time. But after my father died, I dreaded the holiday. Over the years, I have learned to cope with grief through writing. This Father's Day, I want to share some writing prompts that have helped me to remember my father's special place in my life. This post contains six of my writing prompts.
Perfectionism is a double-edged sword. While it can help you achieve greater things in your personal and professional life, it can also lead to a never-ending cycle of self-criticism and low self-esteem. Perfectionists tie their self-worth to their achievements, and if things don't go to plan, they start feeling like they are failures which can destroy their confidence and even self-worth/ image.
For me, psychosis involves auditory hallucinations (hearing voices and sounds) and is the most dangerous part of my illness. The last time I went to the emergency room for symptoms of psychosis, the doctor asked me if I heard voices, and when I answered that I was, he asked an important question, "Do you do what the voices tell you to do?" And unfortunately, my answer was yes. If you can't immediately see the danger in this scenario, try to think of it this way, imagine taking orders from something that is not real. It's alarming. Schizophrenia, voices, combined with suicidal ideation, is even more alarming.
My eating disorder relies on selective memory in order to maintain a stringent foothold in my life. Selective memories are enticing and compelling. They can also be quite dangerous. In fact, as I have come to realize, the presence of selective memory is often the difference between making continual strides in recovery or free-falling back into a cycle of relapse. What do I mean by this, and how am I learning to combat selective memory in my eating disorder? Let me explain.
In the 15 or so years that I've lived with depression, I’ve built a metaphorical toolbox of techniques and relationships that help me keep the darkness at bay. Two of these depression coping tools are my dogs. Here’s how bundles of fur and slobber, known as dogs, help me cope with depression.
If you're a single person with bipolar disorder, surviving can be hard. Last time I outlined why this is in a piece about being alone with bipolar disorder, but this time, I'm focusing on successfully dealing with being a single person with bipolar disorder.
I’m Sammi Caramela, and I’m excited to join HealthyPlace as the new author of "Trauma! A PTSD Blog." I’ve lived most of my life in survival mode, but it wasn’t until I was in my early 20s that I realized I was suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from early childhood trauma. Learning why I was suffering was crucial to healing from the extreme anxiety and depression I coped with on a regular basis.
Because I grew up with the label "shy" instead of "anxious," there are a lot of things I didn’t realize I do because of anxiety, and no one ever recognized them as anxious behaviors. It took me reading about them somewhere else or hearing someone else say them for the lightbulb to go off about my anxious behaviors.
Two weeks ago, I embarked on a massive life change. Moving away from the town where I got sober to begin a new chapter flipped my world upside down. I had to face my fear of change and part ways with the people, places, and things that kept me grounded for three years. My comfort zone was demolished, forcing me to start afresh. 

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Heather
Have u looked up narssisst

I found out that is what mine is 11 years into the marriage!!
Bree
Hi, I have long scars (six-seven inches long or so) reaching from the middle of my hand down my wrist. I've been trying to wear a hoodie to cover them up, but now it's summer, and I don't own any long sleeve shirts because I don't like to wear them. I've tried wearing bracelets and watches, but the scars go too high on my hand. Do you have any ideas for me?

thanks!
Carole Sustin
My two daughters are a year apart at 14 and 15.They both are into boys now and as a mom,i feel it is my duty to protect their purity and innocence.For special occasions i require them to wear rubberpants under their dresses to prevent them from wanting to fool around when they are going to be around boys.They have to wear them for weddings,special church events,Easter,and any other special occasion.Having them wear the rubberpants is very effective and so far they have not become sexually active.I recommend other moms to use rubberpants on their tee girls to protect their purity and innocence!
Chrissy M.
To Hannah Kolter-I to was a puberty bedwetter and like you,wore the cloth diapers and rubberpants to bed every night untill past 15.My younger brother thought it was a 'hoot' that i was in diapers and rubberpants at night! My abuse started at 13 when i was the flowergirl in my niece's wedding.I wore a white sleeveless,poofy,above the knees flowergirl dress with a veil,lace anklets and white shoes.Mom put my diapers and rubberpants on me,telling me they would make me feel cuter and more little girlish for my role as flowergirl!During the wedding dance,an 18 year old guy asked me to dance with him so i did and he started talking to me and told me how cute i looked.After a while,he took me to a class room and told me he wanted to be alone with me and talk.Soon one thing led to another,and he put his hand under my dress and felt my diapers and rubberpants and he got very aroused!He got me to my knees and made me give him oral sex which i had never done before! The next year when i was 14,i did my 8th grade confirmation and us girls had to wear white dresses and veils with tights and white shoes.Mom put the diapers and rubberpants on me again under the tights.A male cousin who came to my party,kept eyeing me,and he saw the diapers and rubberpants under my tights when mom lifted up my dress and showed them to a friend of mine! He got me alone down in our basement and put his hand on the back of my tights and rubbed his hand over the back.He tried to get me to my knees to give him oral sex,but i refused.I finially stopped my bedwetting past 15 and was happy to be out of the diapers and rubberpants!
Crystal, LCSW
Social workers can earn a Doctorate of Social Work degree, so that and other information in this article is incorrect. I have an MSW and I’m a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW). I own a private practice and diagnose and treat mental illnesses, not just provide resources. When writing articles such as this to “educate” the public it would be helpful to do extensive research to ensure the information is accurate.