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Mental Health for the Digital Generation

Annabelle Clawson
Setting boundaries is one of the most important and meaningful mental health practices. When you establish boundaries, you can thrive without burning out. You'll draw a safe space where you can become the best version of yourself. And when you're the best version of yourself, you can give more to those around you. So, even though they're your personal boundaries, they benefit others, too.
Annabelle Clawson
Most of us experience "gut" feelings. Some might say, "I have a feeling this decision is right," or "I sense something is wrong," even though there is not much indication of it. These gut feelings, also known as intuition, urge you to make a choice. When you follow your intuition, you feel connected to your inner self.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
You need a mental health sanctuary because life can be chaotic and overstimulating. Being constantly on the go, facing endless responsibilities and demands, is stressful. Add to this our fast-paced, technological world that has us almost constantly plugged in and connected, and it's easy to feel overwhelmed and even out-of-control. When the brain is bombarded by sensory input, it can have a hard time processing everything. One pleasant and effective way to decompress and reset is to create a soothing sanctuary for your mental health. Keep reading to discover what a mental health sanctuary is, why it's vital, and how to create it.
Annabelle Clawson
I wish I could say that my poor mental health doesn't affect my social life and relationships, but unfortunately, it does. Sometimes, my mental illness makes me unkind, and it's embarrassing to be the one always canceling plans, leaving texts unanswered, and occasionally lashing out at friends and family.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Living with anxiety, depression, or any other mental health challenge can make doing almost anything exceedingly difficult. Recently, we explored how to do things when anxiety and depression interfere, including setting a time limit for yourself, so you know you won't be trapped. Starting by promising yourself you'll try something for just five minutes can feel less daunting and intimidating. While this is true, the act of arriving somewhere and enduring those first few minutes can seem impossible and stop you in your tracks. Read on to discover four tips for surviving nearly anything for just five minutes.
Annabelle Clawson
Hard conversations are, well, hard. Maybe you are avoiding one by waiting for another person to initiate because you don't want to ruin your relationship. Maybe you are avoiding one by convincing yourself that there's nothing to talk about and that issues will magically melt away soon enough. Most of the time, unfortunately, this isn't true. Most of the time, you need to have a difficult conversation.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Depression and anxiety can really get in the way of life. For different reasons, both can prevent you from doing things you want or need to do. Whether depression has robbed you of energy and motivation (your very zest for life), or anxiety keeps you trapped in worries and worst-case scenarios, it can be extremely difficult to do anything. If you need to go places or dive into projects or tasks for work or school, but depression or anxiety are interfering, keep reading to discover tips for doing what you need to do in spite of these bothersome mental health challenges.
Annabelle Clawson
I don't like to feel lazy. I understand the importance of taking breaks for mental health reasons, but I tend to push it until the very last moment (read: until my body and mind force me to slow down). Contrary to what I wish were true, it's better to take breaks for mental health more often, even if you don't feel like you need them.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
Dealing with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be difficult at any age, and it brings unique and especially irritating challenges when you're a young adult. Whether you're newly diagnosed or have been dealing with it since childhood if you're suddenly feeling frustrated by ADHD symptoms and the way they're interfering in how you want to live your life, know that it's natural to feel this way and that you don't have to be forever ruled by ADHD. Here's a look at how ADHD specifically affects young adults and some tips that are different than what you might have seen before.
Annabelle Clawson
I've always had a complicated relationship with my body. I've carried this discomfort with me everywhere I've gone. I've been conscious of how my shirt fell across my stomach, critical of how my jeans fit after a meal. I've wanted my body to be different, so I could feel different. I've counted calories in secret, avoided looking in the mirror, and exercised obsessively. And when nothing changed, my hatred for my body increased. But I don't hate my body anymore. What happened? How did I get here?