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Natasha Tracy
I was recently asked if trauma can cause bipolar disorder. This isn't the first time I have been asked this question. I think the question often comes from two types of people. The first type is people who have trauma in their past and want to know if it caused their own bipolar. The second type is of people who are concerned that trauma may cause or have caused bipolar in another. I can understand the concerns of these people, so let's dig into the question: can trauma cause bipolar disorder?
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
Racing, overwhelming thoughts are a common symptom of anxiety, and it can be difficult to deal with them when it feels like they’re spiraling out of control. I know that when I am anxious, I am overcome with anxious thoughts that I try to control but can’t. We often hear about or talk about strategies to control anxiety, including stopping negative thoughts or changing negative thoughts into positive ones. But what happens when you can't control your thoughts?
Juliana Sabatello
Codependency was a term I remember hearing as a teen but didn’t understand. What is the difference between offering and relying on support from a loved one in times of need and being codependent with that person? I’ve seen people in my life slip into this unhealthy relationship pattern, and I understand now just how mental illness and trauma create the perfect environment for codependency to grow.
Natasha Tracy
I've been asked if being a mental health advocate is worth it. After all, that could describe my full-time, all-time job. As in, since I became a professional mental health advocate, almost all my days are dedicated to it. Whether I'm doing something for a client or not, mental health advocacy is just something I sleep, eat and breathe. But is being a mental health advocate really worth it?
Mahevash Shaikh
You may have noticed the phrase "The Great Resignation" in the news these days. Coined by management professor Anthony Klotz, it is a term to "predict a mass, voluntary exodus from the workplace."[1] In fact, it is more than just a term. According to Harvard Business Review, "the last several months have seen a tidal wave of resignations, in the US and around the world."[2] With so many people quitting their jobs, the thought may have crossed your mind as well. But is this move right for you?
Cheryl Wozny
Are you the verbal abuser perpetuating the cycle of abuse? The cycle of verbal abuse is a complex one that many individuals are unaware of until they are in the middle of it. Often, verbal abusers are acting out learned behaviors that they experienced in their lives.
Annabelle Clawson
I've written for the "Mental Health for the Digital Generation" blog for a little over a year now. My experience as a writer here has been both difficult and rewarding. In writing about mental health, I've had to confront the realities of my own mental illness, a very vulnerable process. I've also gotten to connect with all of you online, which has been a treat.
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
I will be the first person to confess that physical rest does not come easily to me. In fact, one of the most persuasive lies from my eating disorder, which I'm still working to dismantle, is that I am not allowed to rest. For years, I assumed that a body in constant, relentless motion would equal strength, power, and control, whereas a body at rest would signal weakness. However, as recently as this past weekend, I had no choice but to pause and remember that rest is an essential part of eating disorder recovery—and health overall.
Laura A. Barton
Two things are going to become clear in this blog post: my taste in music and that there are songs that remind us that it's okay not to be okay. Realistically, "It's okay not to be okay" is probably a statement you've heard repeatedly in the world of mental health awareness and advocacy. As potentially overused as it is, this sentiment is an important one when combatting mental health stigma.
Nicola Spendlove
Something I started doing when my brother was first diagnosed with mental illness was personifying his mental illness symptoms. This might sound a little kooky but stay with me here.

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Lara
What is the hardest for me is the not knowing . We’ve been dating for 5 months , and he has ghosted me the for the last 6 days. He told me a few months ago he has depression and BP , used to take Cymbalta. I noticed he would hyperfocus on a political issue , definitely had some paranoia. But none of it was horribly alarming. He’s had a rough few months , lost his place in a fire , and had really been struggling . We only see each other once a month or so just due to all the crap going on, and he lives a few hours away from me. I feel like it’s hard to know if this is just him needing space because he has so much crap going on. He has been in a funk for a bit , but then we just had a very passionate , emotional weekend with him telling me all the right things . And then “ poof” a few days later he was stressed about work and hasn’t texted back . This was just so out of character, that I thought he must have broken his phone , or gotten hurt . We literally text all the time , for hours . I couldn’t believe that the very same man who had shared so much with me and been so vulnerable with me would just walk away. Honestly I’m a bit heart broken and so lost and confused. Part of me thinks he just needs some time to sort things out, but the longer it gets without hearing from him , I just think he’s gone . So then of course , I doubt my ability to know someone . We have had such an connection on every level . I feel very taken advantage of . Because we literally talked all the time about the future .
I guess I’m just trying to decide , do I get mad and give him an earful of how hurt I am , which probably will just push him away . Or do I just give him space and hope he comes back , and not contact him until he does. This has been especially hard since he’s the first person I’ve actually dated since getting out of a 23 year marriage 4 years ago. Talk about major trust issues after this !
Mahevash Shaikh
Mahevash Shaikh
Hey Jasmin, you are certainly not alone. I've learned that there's no point in comparing with either neurotypical or neurodivergent people. What we can do is try to do our best and leave it at that. Please be kind to yourself.
Olivia Rivas
That’s been my experience, very very similar. And I’ve never met anyone else who’s experience was like ours. I can not hold down a regular job. I don’t know how to explain that, I just can’t be consistent or in a mold. But I found until 45 lucrative employment in screenwriting and made fantastic real estate choices. I have amassed over a million dollars with high dividend paying stocks. I am on disability and have had bouts of drug addiction. I’m married for the third time. I’m very happy with who I am as a person and My Fay to day life. I learned to speak Spanish when I moved to Mexico for lower living costs. Some times I am weird, reclusive super introverted and introspective. My memory is pretty darn good. I learn new things constantly but think I can see or sense the future and I sm quite sure I really can’t. Sometimes I’m anxious but most often the worse symptom on my drug regime is fatigue and paranoia.