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As someone who has struggled with mental health issues, I know how challenging it can be to maintain self-esteem. The summer solstice, the longest day of the year, provides a powerful metaphor for finding our inner light and strength. Just as the sun reaches its peak, illuminating our world, we too can harness this energy of summer to bolster our self-esteem.
Rejection sensitivity, in general, is difficult, but rejection sensitivity at work is especially hard since a certain level of professionalism is expected. I consider myself highly sensitive, so managing the fear of conflict or being disliked causes me tremendous anxiety. It wasn't until recently that I finally felt I had a sense of control over my emotions in the workplace. That doesn't mean that rejection sensitivity at work isn't difficult, however.
My name is Elizabeth Naraine, and I am excited to join the HealthyPlace community as a new author for "Treating Anxiety." Anxiety has affected me in different ways throughout my life. Beginning in the early years of elementary school, I experienced racing thoughts and a pit in my stomach before the day started. Throughout my teen and adult years, it evolved to constant worrying about my future, career outlook, and relationships. My goal with this blog is to help you feel supported and understood through the challenges of living with anxiety and offer a glimmer of hope that there are effective ways to treat anxiety and overcome it.
I've found that depression and isolation go together. I was responding to a comment on Jennifer Tazzi's blog post "What to Do When Depression Feels Like a Glass Wall" from several years ago. Her post inspired me to write about isolation and derpession because I could relate.
Have you heard of a life script? Changing your life isn't easy, especially when you seek change that stands the test of time. I have been struggling to make some changes, and in a recent therapy session, I learned a technique that can help anyone steer their life in the direction they want. It's called rewriting your life script, and it can transform your life in ways you never thought possible. 
There are healthy alternatives to gambling, but building healthy habits as a recovering gambling addict is not easy. One day, you feel like it's all behind you, and the next, you are fighting the urge not to place that bet. This was me a couple of years back. Weeks and even months of abstinence would crumble at the allure of the casino until I realized that recovering from gambling addiction requires more than just abstaining from placing bets. Recovery also involves finding healthy alternatives to gambling, supporting your current lifestyle.
Preparing for a vacation can be particularly anxiety-inducing for me. There is so much to get done, many things to worry about, and, in my case, two little kids and a giant dog to care for on top of everything else. It is hard to stay motivated and get everything done without feeling brain fog and nausea. Below are six ways I handle my anxiety and vacation preparation in the summer months. 
Goal-setting with borderline personality disorder can be difficult. Living with borderline personality disorder (BPD) feels like being trapped in an endless loop, where the same mistakes replay like a broken record. This seems to be true for me, especially when setting goals. Without smarter goal-setting in BPD, living up to my dreams and aspirations can feel like trying to catch a cloud and pin it down.
During my recent vacation, I faced an unexpected binge-eating challenge. Reflecting on this experience taught me valuable lessons about my relationship with food and how to manage it better. Here's what I learned about binge eating during my vacation.
If you're a digital activist, you need to protect your mental health. In today's hyperconnected world, anyone can be an activist, and so many of us are. It's incredible to see young people actively working to improve the world we live in. However, while advocating for causes like social justice is crucial, so is making time for self-care. After all, digital activism can take a toll on your mental health just as much as traditional activism. Let's explore how you can protect your mental health as a digital activist.

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Comments

Sean Gunderson
Thank you. I'm glad you enjoyed this article
Vincent Gray
I experienced something very similar. I started daydreaming at eleven and continued until I turned 18. It stopped or went away by itself during my national military service. Now and then I have attempted to daydream - but is not as easy as before. I used to daydream for up to four or more hours every day for years. It had a negative affect on my schoolwork and life.
Natasha Tracy
Hi Z,

I'm the Blog Manager here, and I want to address your comment.

First, I'm so sorry you're feeling such distress right now. I want you to know that no matter what mistakes you make, you do not deserve to be physically harmed because of them. It's great that you want to be a good person, but everyone slips. None of us are perfect, and we all deserve patience when that happens. You also deserve love no matter what mistakes you make.

It's normal for your emotions to get the best of you sometimes. It happens to teens a lot because they're growing, changing, and maturing, but it happens to adults too! Please know that a huge amount of guilt probably hurts more than it helps.

It sounds to me like you have some pretty tough things to work through. You should talk to an adult that you trust about what's happening. That might be a parent, or it might be another adult in your life who is supportive and nonjudgmental.

You could also reach out to a professional for help. You could talk to a school counselor, for example. They may be able to help you deal with the emotions you're having more effectively.

You may also want to connect with this resource:

SAFE (Self-Abuse Finally Ends) Alternative
Information Line
800-DONT-CUT (366-8288)
https://selfinjury.com/

Also, remember, you can call 9-8-8 any time to talk to someone. You don't have to be suicidal to call. They may point you toward additional resources.

You're dealing with some difficult emotions right now, but you don't have to do it alone. I've been where you are, and I promise that reaching out in one or more of the above ways can help.

-- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Gregory,

Thanks for your input. I'm the Blog Manager here at HealthyPlace, and I want to address your comment.

I can understand why a person may think that video game addiction doesn't exist, but there is evidence to the contrary. In one meta-analysis, it was found that 5% of gamers have an addiction. In that analysis, they mention that two hours of gaming a day is considered more normal, but five hours or more may indicate the presence of addiction.

They found that engaging in an addictive gaming behavior led to effects such as lower academic scores, depression, anxiety, and a decrease in self-esteem, life satisfaction, and social support.

You can see more here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001691823002238?via%3Dihub

Internet gaming disorder was even included in the latest "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM-5-TR"). More information about it, including diagnostic criteria, can be found here: https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/internet-gaming

It's worth noting that while professionals can, of course, help with any addiction, there are steps anyone can take to help with gaming addiction that don't cost anything. https://www.healthyplace.com/addictions/gaming-disorder/addicted-to-video-games-and-online-gaming-what-now

Most gamers are not addicted, but it is absolutely true that some are.

There is quackery out there, but this is not evidence of it.

-- Natasha Tracy