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It’s the middle of the summertime, and every day is hot and humid. I hate this time of year; I find this kind of weather so anxiety-provoking and draining.
Building healthier self-esteem takes courage. Your courage will help you make the changes you choose to make to your actions and attitudes that will allow you to feel more confident and self-reliant. But where do you find the courage to become the person you wish to be? How do you begin to practice courage to build strong self-esteem?
As the eyes and ears of American society are fixed on dismantling more than 400 years of racial injustice at this pivotal moment in time, the intersection of racial trauma and eating disorders must be part of this broader conversation.
I've loved writing for the "Living a Blissful Life" blog at HealthyPlace, but the time has come for me to move on. Here, I'll leave you with a few parting thoughts about how to live a happy, fulfilling life. 
If you've never heard of the term "time-blindness," you aren't alone. I've been researching and writing about mental health for nearly 10 years, and I only heard the term last year, even though it is a major problem for a lot of people, especially those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Typically on this blog, I talk about how I am recovering from depression and anxiety, but I have strongly identified with the symptoms of ADHD for a few years now, ever since I started reading resources on what ADHD looks like in girls and adults. Once this pandemic is over, I plan on being professionally evaluated to see if I actually have ADHD or if my ADHD symptoms are connected to something else. Regardless of a diagnosis, I definitely experience time-blindness, and it makes life in general difficult, but it can also create big problems for my mental health.
Living with dissociative identity disorder (DID) means you need as many tools as you can find to remain grounded and stable. This can be difficult when you are trying to balance a routine made up of work, family and friends. However, I’ve been able to find solace in an unusual place: my iPhone.
Like many binge eating disorder sufferers, I've always had a complicated relationship with my body — particularly when it comes to learning to love exercise. I was the typical kid who always got picked last in gym class, and that experience gave me an aversion to exercise that lasted into adulthood. Instead of taking care of my body through movement, I learned to self-soothe with food, alcohol, and other destructive behaviors.
I joined HealthyPlace as I began to reckon with the mental symptoms of my chronic illness. For years, I struggled with depression that came as a side effect to my steroids, the disordered eating that I developed as a result of my gastrointestinal trouble, and the trauma that came from a lifetime of health problems. But I was never able to treat these symptoms with the same regard as my physical ones. The HealthyPlace community helped me validate my struggle with mental health. But the time of COVID has been especially scary for those of us with chronic illness and I'm struggling to stay on top of my business, my graduate studies, and my health. So, though I will miss my HealthyPlace community, I have decided to leave the Relationships and Mental Illness blog in order to lighten my load a little and protect my physical and mental health.
Intermittent fasting involves using short periods of fasting followed by shorter periods of eating to help your body lose fat, gain muscle, and balance hormones— but is intermittent fasting safe for people in eating disorder recovery? Five years ago I tried it, and the outcome of this experience was lifechanging. 
Years ago, I learned about the benefit of using meditation to cope with anxiety, but I did not really give it much thought. That was until I realized that I was already often doing it when I was experiencing tremendous anxiety. Meditation has been an incredibly beneficial tool in my anxiety-coping toolbox. You may find that it is valuable for you and that it helps you in several ways.

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Comments

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Lizanne,
Yes! Anxiety can very much be like a guide, and the bumps on a freeway is a great metaphor! I love this insight.
Hani
Anxiety has caused me push my love ones away because I cannot see them having to deal with me, my outburst, my unstable emotional bouts. I'm still dealing with it and I really wish I can be away from everyone.
Mahevash Shaikh
Always lovely to read your insightful thoughts, Lizanne. Yes <3
Ashley
Don’t argue with her be the one to walk away let her stay wherever she is as long it’s not in public and there are no items she can harm u or herself with. She will eventually come down or up. Don’t insult her she ll feel bad enough for putting you through it. Watch her carefully for the next few days tell her u love her and the right meds will come around let her know your there if she needs to cry or laugh or talk emotional stability is what she needs somebody to ground her in a emotional supportive way.
TJ DeSalvo
Thank you, I'm glad you liked it.