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Recently, I posed a challenge to myself to see if I could tolerate one day without a fitness tracker. This experiment should have been simple: Just set the device aside, then continue with all my normal activities for about 12 hours. The key phrase here is "should have been simple." But to be honest, it was so painfully difficult. Here's why I took on this endeavor—plus the humbling lessons I learned from one day without a fitness tracker. 
Opening up about borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms can present unique challenges, and disclosing this condition to immigrant Filipino parents adds another layer of complexity. My BPD symptoms include intense mood swings, fear of abandonment, and unstable self-image. Opening up about my borderline personality disorder symptoms with parents who come from a culture and generation that stigmatizes mental health issues is a delicate and, at times, painful process. 
Healing from my trauma required me to tell my trauma story — but not to over-identify with it. When I first began my healing journey, I would talk about my trauma to anyone who would listen: new friends, strangers on the Internet, distant family members, etc. In a way, telling my trauma story — and owning what I'd been through and how I got myself through it — empowered me. It gave me a sense of purpose and a feeling of pride; it also gifted me with much-needed validation.
My name is Kris McElroy, and I am the new author of "Dissociative Living." I received a diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder (DID) in 2013 when I was 28 years old. Since then, I have been navigating the complexities of living with DID, especially in relation to parenting, coexisting with alters, professional pursuits, and interpersonal relationships. I aspire to foster a shared understanding through the exchange of our experiences as we navigate the journey of dissociative living together.
Verbal abuse can affect many areas of life, including your view of body image and diet. Because this abusive tactic targets your self-esteem, experiencing negative comments about your weight can directly impact how you manage food consumption. In short, verbal abuse can affect your diet choices.
Schizoaffective anxiety and recovering from surgery are a particularly bad combination. Yesterday, I was picking up some packages from the mail room. The mailroom is down a flight of stairs from our apartment. Only one package of four free COVID tests would fit in my tote bag, so I had to carry the other one by hand. I have a system for getting the mail on such occasions since I just had double knee surgery, and it’s hard for me to get up and down stairs. Schizoaffective anxiety in recovery makes it harder because I'm scared.
One of the most significant symptoms of anxiety that I have struggled with has been hypervigilance. Hypervigilance pertains to being on guard and alert for threats in the environment and may result in engaging in behavior with the purpose of preventing danger.1
For the longest time, I felt something was wrong with me for being an introvert. While most kids my age loved noisy parties and socializing, I preferred quiet one-on-one conversations and the company of books. In tenth grade, when an unimaginative bully called me "boring," I took her jibe to heart. It took me a couple of years to realize she was dead wrong. I am not boring; I am an introvert. And there is nothing wrong with being an introvert. 
I fell into habit tracking because in a world that is constantly changing, having clearly defined action steps is comforting. I’m able to trick my mind into creating a productive routine that feels more like a game than a chore. Sticking to healthy routines has a tremendously positive impact on my mental health, and it’s never been easier to do because I found a way that I enjoy. (Who doesn’t like the feeling of being able to check off boxes?)
In my life, embracing setbacks has been a recurring theme. Setbacks are the unexpected twists in my mental health journey. Embracing setbacks has been a transformative experience, prompting me to reconsider their nature and my response to them. 

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Tom
I’m going through this right now. My ex has cut off all contact.

She has untreated bipolar.

We met middle of October. It was very long distance. She was 3 hours away. We were seeing each other for two months until Dec 18th when she suddenly broke it off. I think she went on a date with another guy the night before. I’m pretty sure that’s why she broke it off.

But I stayed in contact for about three weeks texting a couple of times a day. Asking her to come back.

Then suddenly early in January she agreed to come back to me.

Things were brilliant for about four weeks. She came back saying she was all in, that all she was asking for was honesty and openness. That we communicate with each other about how we are feeling.

Then early in February I noticed a drop off in energy from her.

I kept going….but then she started buying concert tickets with friends/family and not inviting me. She started saying how busy she was and time to meet would be very limited.

On Feb 12 I got it into my head to see if she was on Tinder. So I set up a profile, literally not expecting to find her, and there she was. You can understand how that made me feel.

So I asked her if we were a thing. And she snapped. Attacked me. Told me we’d been through this and that I was being insensitive. She started saying she didn’t think this was for her. Threatening to end it because I asked her if we were boyfriend and girlfriend. She was very nasty to me.

When she said that I showed her the screenshot of her profile. She backed off a little but was very defensive and distant. She never apologised and still hasn’t.


After that she pulled right back. I was supposed to visit her for Valentine’s Day but she broke up with me in a text that day.

She blamed me for the argument. She said it was my fault. She has taken literally no responsibility for any of her words or actions. I was to blame. I was causing pressure and she needed to cut me out.

Since then I’ve tried to talk to her. To reason with her. Tried to reassure her that I’m there but she’s stonewalled me and blocked me on all messengers.

She has been very nasty, hurtful. When we got back together she was warm, affectionate, kind and loving. That person is now gone.

And she is gone. I think there’s a new guy already.

Can anybody explain?

Do you think her untreated bipolar is to blame for the in-out breakup, impulsiveness and instability?
Jerm
I am 14 and started sometime around the middle of 2023, I was sad due to misssing my friend who was in the psych ward at the time and I have continued periodically from then. Part of the reason I continue is a little embarrassing but I enjoy the taste of blood and frequently I cut just to taste it again. It resulted in lighter scars that cover most of my left arm, and a couple large ones on my leg. I have come to peace with them and I have become quite used to them. To me they represent healing and I’m proud of them and most times I am proud of them, Though I still do hide any that are fresh until they heal
Kelly
The thing that always bothered me about this study is - what if you only WANT one marshmallow? What if you always only eat small amounts? What if you have a small stomach and you know that two marshmallows will upset it? If you don’t WANT the second marshmallow, why wait? So the kid who eats the marshmallow is labeled as someone who doesn’t have restraint - when they actually have restraint every day.
I was a one piece of candy kid. And I hated marshmallows. So they’re also assuming ALL kids like marshmallows. I wouldn’t have eaten it, would have been praised, and then would have been given two marshmallows. And did they just send the kids on their way? If they had followed ME out, they would have seen me dump both in the garbage. But would that have made it into the study? No.
And people still quote this stupid study. Thank you for pointing out the flaws.
Nez
I am here due to same problem, Ive drunk a whole bottle of champagne as a lemonade not the first time, and phoned a guy that was at work st that time, it started sweet and then I just can’t get over how stupid I was what I was saying to him. He cut me off. Don’t blame him Id do same thing if I were him, I feel like an idiot, honestly I really liked him and it was mutual, but sure not any more. I don’t know if I should call him apologise admitting Ive got a problem, he knows that now anyway don’t think itd change anything, or just leave it. Feeling like blocking him too. Im overthinking this too much. Im feeling so embarrassed. I know this feeling will subside and I am not touching alcohol anymore. I hope. I can’t remember if I ever had made such a fool of myself..
John
I had read voraciously since a child due to not having a tv in the home. Nothing to do with trauma. I would rather read than watch tv even as an adult.