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TJ DeSalvo
I’ve written for this blog for a few years, and in that time, I’ve given a lot of advice for what I think are good strategies for keeping one’s anxiety under control. For that reason, It would be easy for anyone reading this to label me an “expert,” even though I don’t have the academic credentials to be labeled as such.
Laura A. Barton
Many workplaces say their employees' mental wellbeing matters, but not all workplaces are built the same. Some promote mental wellness but don't deliver, whereas others do. With starting a new job, I feel for the first time like I'm someplace where my workplace actually cares about mental wellness.
Nicola Spendlove
I've been overwhelmed recently. My social world is reopening post-pandemic, my work is busy, and I'm back at college in the evenings. While these are things that I'm very grateful for, having such a busy schedule leaves little space for me to relax and regulate myself. Last week, my boss said something to me that completely challenged my perspective. She suggested that I take all the supportive skills I've learned from my caring roles (both for my brother and in a professional context) and offer them to myself.
Martha Lueck
If you experience intense mood swings and start behaving out of character, it might be easy to blame it on a mood disorder. For instance, if you have skipped classes several times, you might say that it was because of your anxiety. While that was probably a huge reason for it, there could be more specific reasons as to why your anxiety increased. The things that stimulate a negative change in your thoughts, behaviors, and actions can be loosely thought of as your triggers. Identifying your triggers so that you can deal with them is important for you to manage your mood disorder symptoms and increase your quality of life. To learn how to recognize and deal with your triggers, continue reading this post.
Nicola Spendlove
Codependency can look different ways for different people. For me, an effect of codependency was losing sight of what I actually wanted, as opposed to what choice would make me happy.
Kate Beveridge
I just celebrated my first marriage anniversary. When I was younger, my borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms were so intense that I struggled to maintain long-term, healthy relationships. However, I have adopted some strategies to keep my marriage and myself healthy.
Elizabeth Caudy
This summer, I went to Door County once again with most of my immediate family, including my brother’s new baby. Of course, my schizoaffective disorder came along for the ride. I didn’t have a perfect trip, but I still managed to have a reasonably good time.
Kim Berkley
Whether you're just dipping your toes into self-harm recovery for the first time or looking for a new tool to add to your existing recovery toolbox, self-harm help books can provide invaluable support on your healing journey. Here are a few tips for conducting your search and some suggestions for finding budget-friendly options.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC, DAIS
I have thoroughly enjoyed being here, writing the "Anxiety-Schmanxiety Blog" every week for the past eight years. I actually didn't plan to stop blogging for HealthyPlace, but I must do so for health reasons. I've discovered that living with autoimmune and digestive disorders means that I can't just continue to let my mind be fully in charge of what I do, doing what I want, and ignoring my body. Listening to ourselves, tuning into what our entire body-mind communicates is key to both mental and physical heath--including when it comes to managing anxiety. So honoring that, listening to what my body has been trying to tell me, means that I must step back from this blog.
Sarah Sharp
When choosing a topic to write about for "Life with Bob," I usually like to try to pick just the right one, maybe even do some research to see what my readers are asking about on Google. This week, though, I can only think about one thing: my child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) won't listen to me.

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Lara
What is the hardest for me is the not knowing . We’ve been dating for 5 months , and he has ghosted me the for the last 6 days. He told me a few months ago he has depression and BP , used to take Cymbalta. I noticed he would hyperfocus on a political issue , definitely had some paranoia. But none of it was horribly alarming. He’s had a rough few months , lost his place in a fire , and had really been struggling . We only see each other once a month or so just due to all the crap going on, and he lives a few hours away from me. I feel like it’s hard to know if this is just him needing space because he has so much crap going on. He has been in a funk for a bit , but then we just had a very passionate , emotional weekend with him telling me all the right things . And then “ poof” a few days later he was stressed about work and hasn’t texted back . This was just so out of character, that I thought he must have broken his phone , or gotten hurt . We literally text all the time , for hours . I couldn’t believe that the very same man who had shared so much with me and been so vulnerable with me would just walk away. Honestly I’m a bit heart broken and so lost and confused. Part of me thinks he just needs some time to sort things out, but the longer it gets without hearing from him , I just think he’s gone . So then of course , I doubt my ability to know someone . We have had such an connection on every level . I feel very taken advantage of . Because we literally talked all the time about the future .
I guess I’m just trying to decide , do I get mad and give him an earful of how hurt I am , which probably will just push him away . Or do I just give him space and hope he comes back , and not contact him until he does. This has been especially hard since he’s the first person I’ve actually dated since getting out of a 23 year marriage 4 years ago. Talk about major trust issues after this !
Mahevash Shaikh
Mahevash Shaikh
Hey Jasmin, you are certainly not alone. I've learned that there's no point in comparing with either neurotypical or neurodivergent people. What we can do is try to do our best and leave it at that. Please be kind to yourself.
Olivia Rivas
That’s been my experience, very very similar. And I’ve never met anyone else who’s experience was like ours. I can not hold down a regular job. I don’t know how to explain that, I just can’t be consistent or in a mold. But I found until 45 lucrative employment in screenwriting and made fantastic real estate choices. I have amassed over a million dollars with high dividend paying stocks. I am on disability and have had bouts of drug addiction. I’m married for the third time. I’m very happy with who I am as a person and My Fay to day life. I learned to speak Spanish when I moved to Mexico for lower living costs. Some times I am weird, reclusive super introverted and introspective. My memory is pretty darn good. I learn new things constantly but think I can see or sense the future and I sm quite sure I really can’t. Sometimes I’m anxious but most often the worse symptom on my drug regime is fatigue and paranoia.