advertisement

Blogs

I spent most of my time in active addiction fearful of what others would think about me; but when I slowly began to open up about my sex addiction, I was incredibly surprised by the reactions I received from people. Some individuals pleasantly surprised me with their love and support, others made me feel like a piece of garbage, and a few of them completely creeped me out. Nonetheless, I am grateful I finally spoke up about my sex addiction, because I know now that the reactions from other people (even people I love) don't get to define me.
New research suggests that poor “interoception” – the process by which we notice and understand internal sensations, like how hungry or thirsty we are –- may contribute to eating disorders. It turns out that when it comes to disordered eating, the common stereotypes that restricting stems from an unrelenting quest for thinness and bingeing is due to a lack of self-control are wrong.
Mental illnesses are devastating. Even when the dust settles after your initial diagnosis, it's hard to see how there can be anything positive about mental illness. However, recovery is full of surprises.
While trying to overcome negative thoughts, you may not have simply given in to them. This surprising method of dealing with negative self-talk can be extremely powerful. 
Few people think of anxiety as a scheduling affair; however, conceptualizing anxiety relief as something that involves planning can help you schedule away your anxiety. Imagine being able to schedule anxiety out of your life. There are multiple ways to do it. Here we'll explore three different ways to use the concept of scheduling to drastically reduce anxiety.
Is your job causing your depression? I get it. Work is supposed to be stressful. It's called work and not play for a reason, after all. But there's a difference between experiencing stress on occasion and experiencing stress every single day. In fact, it's possible that what you think is stress is actually depression, and that your job is what is causing your depression. 
If you know someone who is struggling with low self-esteem, you may have many instinctive reactions about how best to help him or her. Also, when that person is someone you deeply care about, you may think that you have to go to a lot of extra effort to boost his or her self-esteem; which is understandable – it just shows you’re trying to be supportive. However, for someone who has low self-esteem, there are certain things you might say which – although said with positive intentions – can be quite unhelpful. In fact, certain comments can make that person feel worse about themselves. Here are some examples of things to avoid saying to someone with low self-esteem.
Do you know how many alters your system contains? Can you ever really know how many parts you have?
Radical acceptance is a term often taught in dialectical behavior therapy. It pulls from Buddhist principles and is the act of fully accepting reality just as it is. I have found that many of the DBT principles are simple in theory but difficult to implement. Radical acceptance is no exception, but there are many benefits of radically accepting things you cannot change.
Going on vacation with borderline personality disorder can bring added challenges. A few years ago, when I was on vacation with my friend in France, I found myself crying on the bathroom floor in the middle of the night becoming increasingly distressed and desperate to be at home. I love going on vacation and being lucky enough to explore new places, but there are times when going away causes me additional challenges for managing my borderline personality disorder (BPD).  

Follow Us

advertisement

Most Popular

Comments

Elyah
I thought about this response before I chose to type it out. I understand both the desirable need, as well as the fear, of the unseen worlds. Do not fear them, accept it for what you know it is, and ask for help from the benevolent beings. Not the ones that tell you you're unworthy, that you can't make it, that you're insignificant to this world. Ask for guidance from the ones that guide you to eating healthy food, building your strengths and skills and loving yourself. You're special and you have a gift. Using it appropriately and harnessing that gift, could be a lifelong journey.
QT
It sounds as though you may have suppressed some painful feelings in order to have your girlfriend back in your life. It's best to deal with it in some way, like writing her a letter about your feelings.
Laura Barton
Hello Leif. Thanks for taking your time to share these thoughts. I know it's not always easy to bare our souls like this. I'm not the author that wrote this blog (he was my partner blogger for this section of HealthyPlace), but I just wanted to reach out and let you know that I hear you and your thoughts and feelings are valid.

It can get overwhelming when things can't seem to sort themselves out in our heads and we feel like we just can't quite do anything. I think the fact that you're recognizing these signs of struggle in yourself is important and I encourage you to reach out to your local resources to explore the help options available. I know what it's like to have thoughts of ending your life running through your head—I get that way, too. If you're ever at a point where you feel like you can't escape it, please know there are resources available. We have a great list of the available suicide hotline numbers here on our website. I've grabbed you the link: https://www.healthyplace.com/suicide/suicide-hotline-phone-numbers. We also have a page of other resources you can consider to help you with your struggles: http://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/resources/mental-health-hotline-numbers-and-referral-resources/.

Just know that you aren't alone in this struggle and that you're worthy of help. Don't be afraid to reach out.
Danielle w.
I left my abuser 5 months ago with my 5 year old daughter. She is handling things fairly well but i am feeling like i at war with myself. I am an outgoing fun girl to loves to hang out and go out and have people over for dinners and what not ,but this side of being cautious hesitant and a bit scared or mistrusting is in the way and im trying to break the chains. The stronger side of me says it wont defeat me and yet im still being pulled back by that part of myself that wants to hide away. I want to make friends and invite ppl over and introduce to my kid as well in time but cant seem to get there. I dont feel like friend or family understand fully and no way of talking to a theropist or counciler.How can i win this fight against myself?
Danny
Hi, my girlfriend of 3 years recently left me. She has been untreated bipolar abs an eating disorder. We were both happily live and she is the most loving caring person I know. Two days after graduating from college she suddenly got very depressed. She was saying she was miserable and life was pointless and wanted to break up. Apart from that she gave no specific reason..in fact she giving reasons to stay (I’m her best friend, done more for her than anybody etc). I made contact with her 2 weeks after the break up but her reply was cold and distant. She has also ghosted me when I see her at the gym. It’s like she doesn’t recognize me. After 3 years I’m heartbroken. As far as I know she is working away as normal and living life as if the previous 3 years didn’t happen. It’s difficult to get me head around things. She may be going through a depressive cycle and trying to put a brave face on things, I don’t know. My heat sinks as I doubt she’ll ever speak to me again and I don’t know why. Any advice welcome