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Many people spend time trying to figure out why they have bipolar disorder. There are many things that can contribute to it, so its origins often aren't really clear. But the question is, does it really matter why you have bipolar disorder?
Learning that I had posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was the first important step in my trauma recovery. Symptoms of the disorder typically start within three months of a traumatic event but in some cases, there can be a delay. Because of PTSD stigma, people often dismiss symptoms of the disorder until it is no longer possible to ignore them.
My husband Tom and I have a cat. But he’s no ordinary cat. He’s an ageless cat modeled after the character Puss in Boots from the Shrek movies. Even though he’s not a living, breathing pet, he feels like part of the family.
When talking about self-injury, often we are describing the act of causing oneself physical harm or pain. But can self-harm be emotional, too?
Anxiety can be miserable and frustrating to live with, and many people who experience it want to know what the common causes of anxiety might be. While the answer isn't always straightforward (worry and fear, after all, are complex conditions with multiple causes and contributing factors that are different for each individual), there are some common anxiety causes. Knowing what they are can help you identify what might be increasing your own anxiety. Then, you can address them as part of your process of beating anxiety. 
It is not an easy time for anyone right now, and dealing with bipolar during this crisis is very difficult. The ongoing social and economic upheaval of the COVID-19 crisis, and the civil unrest in the wake of the tragic and senseless murder of George Floyd on May 25, have triggered feelings of fear, anxiety, anger, and depression in many people. Such feelings are natural and appropriate responses to racism, violence, isolation, and financial uncertainty. And they can make focusing on work extremely difficult, if not impossible -- especially for those of us already dealing with mental health challenges such as bipolar disorder.
Here is a truth about me that I once believed to be impossible: My eating disorder is not at the forefront of my mind right now—and I love the way it feels. All my mental energy used to be allocated to tracking how many calories I ate, miles I ran, or pounds I weighed. I fixated on these so incessantly, in fact, that I had no stamina and concentration to focus on anything else.
What does verbal abuse look like? That's a good question because when verbal abuse happens in a relationship, the abuse can be subtle, overt, or somewhere in between. Verbal abuse is often subtle in the beginning stages of a partnership, and then it evolves, becoming much more recognizable. I've asked myself this question many times: "How do I know if his actions and words constitute verbal abuse?"
It's natural to wonder how to protest if you have anxiety. The protests resonate with us, but it's difficult to go out and raise your voice in solidarity when you live with anxiety.
A sure sign of healthy self-esteem is being your own best friend--loving and accepting yourself exactly as you are. This is a bottom-line requirement for strong self-esteem. Often, we only recognize the things about ourselves that disappoint us and pay no attention to our talents and accomplishments.

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Comments

Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Lizanne,
Yes! Anxiety can very much be like a guide, and the bumps on a freeway is a great metaphor! I love this insight.
Hani
Anxiety has caused me push my love ones away because I cannot see them having to deal with me, my outburst, my unstable emotional bouts. I'm still dealing with it and I really wish I can be away from everyone.
Mahevash Shaikh
Always lovely to read your insightful thoughts, Lizanne. Yes <3
Ashley
Don’t argue with her be the one to walk away let her stay wherever she is as long it’s not in public and there are no items she can harm u or herself with. She will eventually come down or up. Don’t insult her she ll feel bad enough for putting you through it. Watch her carefully for the next few days tell her u love her and the right meds will come around let her know your there if she needs to cry or laugh or talk emotional stability is what she needs somebody to ground her in a emotional supportive way.
TJ DeSalvo
Thank you, I'm glad you liked it.