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Getting Through Tough Times

Have you ever been really tired during the day and had no idea why? Maybe you got eight hours of sleep, but woke up still feeling groggy. Perhaps you or someone you know slept several hours during the day, which caused you to miss important events. If you have a mood disorder, it can be easy to blame anxiety or depression on daytime tiredness. But you could also have a sleep disorder called Hypersomnia. To learn about Hypersomnia and how it could affect your mental health, read this article.
How can you support yourself and your partner? Many people believe that it is selfish to think about their own needs instead of someone else's. As a result, they put their loved ones first, sacrificing their own mental health. But what if I told you that it is possible to support yourself and your partner? The key is to balance the support you want to distribute. To learn about how my boyfriend and I find a healthy balance in our relationship, supporting ourselves and each other, read this article.
I have to know how to cope in winter to help lessen my seasonal affective disorder (SAD). By the end of February, the majority of people in the United States assume that spring is really on its way. Depending on where they live, they might get a taste of spring weather in early March. In some places, however, winter weather can seem to linger on forever. Read this article to learn about how the winter has affected my depression and what I am doing to cope.
When your anxiety keeps you awake, trying to fall asleep can be extremely difficult. It becomes an endless cycle where you feel anxious you aren't sleeping, and then you can't sleep because you are feeling anxious. Many people, including me, get especially anxious at night and aren't sure how to manage it as well before bed. In this article, we will cover how to fall asleep when your anxiety keeps you awake. 
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) also known as seasonal depression, causes those of us who struggle with it to feel more depressed during the winter. If you notice that in the winter months you feel fatigued, poor sleep patterns, weight gain, or irritable, you could be one of many who struggles with SAD. In this article, you'll learn some natural ways to fight Seasonal Affective Disorder.
Before I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression, I did not appreciate the importance of self-care. Sure, I knew that it was important to practice good hygiene, work hard in school, exercise, etc. But I had no idea that self-care required more than just the basics for living. I had no idea that self-care activities can be so different for everyone. By using the Olga Phoenix Self-Care Wheel, I learned how to truly care for my wellbeing. Read this article to learn about how the self-care wheel has helped me with my mental health.
Social media can contribute to depression. Social media does have benefits: it is a powerful tool we can use to stay connected to friends and family and even allows us the ability to meet new friends from all over the world. While scrolling through the feed may seem harmless, and even if you do not notice it at the time, social media can contribute to depression.
The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus defines small talk as a "social conversation about unimportant things, often between people who do not know each other well." Almost every time you leave your house, you probably find yourself engaging in this type of interaction. Many people dislike it because it might seem forced and insincere. While some people might simply feel obligated to talk to you, others genuinely want to have a conversation. Read this article to learn about how to benefit from small talk.
Getting things done when you don't feel like it can be more challenging than it sounds. It is so easy to look at our to-do list and become paralyzed. This happens to me more often than I would like, but when I catch myself, there are a few things I do that help me. Read this article to learn three ways to get things done when you don't feel like it.
Most of us know a little bit about the midlife crisis, but have you heard about the quarter-life crisis? LinkedIn career expert Blair Decembrele describes the quarter-life crisis as "a period of insecurity and doubt that many people in their mid 20s to early 30s go through surrounding their career, relationships, and finances."1 A quarter-life crisis can be debilitating. To learn more about the quarter-life crisis and its effects on mental health, read this article.