advertisement

Treating Anxiety

We are on the verge of a new year, and that's making some of us anxious. This has been a challenging year, to say the least, and as we get closer to the end of the year, we are still living in uncertain times. I know that, personally, these uncertain times continue to cause tremendous amounts of anxiety as we approach the turn of the year.
We are now in the holiday season, and even though things look a little different than they typically would around this time, remember that you can overcome anxiety with gratefulness. I know that anxiety is something many of us can't seem to avoid. We may even find that we are experiencing more anxiety than usual.
I noticed while trying to think of a topic for this week's article that I often write about anxiety in terms of the individual experiencing it, but up until now, that has not included asking for help when you're anxious. I'll sometimes bring up things like helping someone else with anxiety, but I rarely discuss how to ask for help when you feel anxious yourself.
It's that time of year again. It's the holiday season, and the anxiety that goes with it is here too. Even though the holidays look a little different this year due to COVID-19, anxiety is still something that you may experience. I know I do.
Why would you think like a scientist to reduce anxiety, and what does mindfulness have to do with it? I've noticed something over the past several weeks, and I want you to know how thinking like a scientist can greatly reduce the anxiety you feel.
When dealing with social anxiety, I have often seen it associated with shyness or introversion. However, I do think there is a fundamental difference, primarily at the root of the anxiety.
It's hard to stay motivated when you are experiencing anxiety. I have goals that I continuously set for myself, but when I'm anxious, it's hard to stay productive and driven to work towards those goals.
I love getting time to myself in nature because it soothes my anxiety. Whether it's going for a hike, bike ride, or even driving through a forest, finding time in a natural setting away from more populated areas is very soothing and enjoyable for me.
I have found that one of the most difficult aspects of dealing with chronic anxiety is coping with panic attacks. Even though I've learned how to lessen the effects of panic attacks over time, I can still be unexpectedly blindsided by one.
If I told you that the two simple words "both . . . and" could help you reduce your anxiety, would you try to use them? It may sound too good to be true, but over the past week, I've been thinking about how valuable these two words can be for producing a meaningful shift in how we think about anxiety.