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I think hot weather makes bipolar disorder worse. It seems to do this in multiple ways. Some of this is my opinion, while some of it is based on evidence. Regardless, though, hot weather definitely makes my bipolar worse.
When you experience a panic attack, the physical sensations are so intense they often cloud your judgment. For example, you may hyperventilate while the room seems to spin and your heart is about to race out of your chest. Some people may also feel like they're cornered in a flight-or-fight situation and may even self-harm during a panic attack. Why does that happen? I'm not sure I have the answers, but I can offer my personal insight.
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) can be an isolating disorder. I have spent many years feeling separate from other people and like an outsider in social situations. These feelings started when I was a child and have continued into adulthood, although they have changed. 
Britney Spears' conservatorship has been a hot topic since she was able to say her piece in court on June 23. It's caused fans to rally behind her, supporting her as she struggles with being under other peoples' control for more than a decade and the impact that's had on her mental wellbeing. Perhaps ironically, it was a mental health crisis that kicked off the conservatorship, to begin with. I can't help but wonder, what has been mental health stigma's role in keeping that conservatorship in place?
Before I chose to start the journey of freedom from my eating disorder in 2017, I took it as a source of pride that I rarely shed tears or expressed vulnerable emotions. The sheer fact I was able to count on one hand the number of times I cried in a 10-year period felt like a badge of honor. I feared the consequences of vulnerability, assuming any crack in my hard, stoic exterior would leave me open to rejection or betrayal. But underneath this tough shell of self-protection, there's always been a sensitive, compassionate soul with emotions that run deep and tears that ache to flow. Reclaiming those tears now feels cathartic for me, and I think it's important to name this as part of my healing process.
I've been learning in therapy that so many of the things I've accepted as "fact" all my life are actually subjective beliefs passed down from my family. I loved the challenge my therapist set me this week of deconstructing my family's beliefs on various topics, including mental health.
I missed my last scheduled blog post due to illness, but in truth, I was relieved because aside from the gastric flu wreaking havoc with my digestive system, I didn't have anything to talk about. I was (and am) doing well. When I sat down to write this week's piece, I had a similar bittersweet realization. This blog is "Coping with Depression," but at the moment, I don't feel as though I am "coping" with anything in particular. I am, for all intents and purposes, recovered from depression. Does that mean I should give up writing this blog? I think not.
My mom and I go north to Door County in Wisconsin together every spring for our mother-daughter weekend--just the two of us. We go back up with the rest of the family later in the summer. Last year, things were very restricted because of COVID-19. This year, we were vaccinated. Being vaccinated really helped with my schizoaffective anxiety, and it also made a big difference for our trip.
A self-harm mantra may not be the magical cure we wish it could be, but it can be a powerful tool to help you focus and stay motivated on the road to self-harm recovery. Here are a few ideas to help you choose or craft your own healing mantra.
Anxiety can make people feel inferior and erode self-confidence. The harsh, self-critical, judgmental voice of anxiety can also distort the way we see ourselves, causing us to ignore our positive qualities and exaggerate our very human flaws and foibles. If anxiety ever makes you hard on yourself, keep reading. You don't have to take anxiety's word at face value.

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Comments

JGR
I feel more okay with myself after reading this! Thank you, I am not alone! Someone else shares my feelings and experience! Thank you for sharing and sending you love and gratitude.
Alvin
I have been divorced for 5 years now and my ex and i have 4 kids together. I try to back her up if our kiddos are getting out of line. But, recently my 12 year old got out of school suspension for pantsing another kid.
Anyway, I tried to call my son to talk to him and he just keeps hanging up on me. So as a consequence for his suspension and disrespectfully behavior. I let my ex know I was taking his cell phone and nintendo switch. She ended the call with "You're such a p***e of s***. Needles to say I lived for 16 years with her always calling me offensive names. It has caused my 12 year old to repeat his mothers words to me nonstop
Andrea Guilds
I am a bit shocked right now, but in a good way. I have heard this word so much lately and you can imagine that as someone with OCD it can throw us into a spiral. Then I stopped and asked, wait, I have a disorder that constantly makes me question reality on my own so am I the gaslighter to myself? That’s is what led to an epiphany and to this article and you are right. I have went through two rounds of ERP after going through CBT, ACT, and many different therapies and ERP is the therapy that has helped me most, but with the subtypes of OCD that I have, gaslighting is triggering and my OCD grabbed it up without hesitation. That one and Narcissism which is also everywhere. In OCD and out I feel there is unconscious gaslighting. Have I actively done it to someone else? Most likely. Have someone done it to me? Yes, but the whole point is so we just roll over and give up? No, we work to go within ourselves to resolve the issue and to work towards the best version of ourselves. Well said, I applaud you for writing this!
Yona
Hello Jay,
I would like to know how you proceeded with this. I am in a relationship with my dear boyfriend for 4 years and it's even a long distance relationship so it makes it a lot harder for me to interact and help them. My boyfriend has DID also. If you need to speak to someone who is in a similar situation as you, you can contact me on my email jonadadervishi100@gmail.com
I don't know about your partner but I am very honest and sincere with my partner, especially about his disorder and me talking to others on online platforms about this and he feels grateful and feels like I am there for him so we both might be able to help each other, if you and she wishes
Zane
I was skeptical that such a seemingly pseudoscientific technique could work but a recent systemic review of randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses found that EFT was in fact an evidence based treatment. It was published in a highly reputable peer-reviewed journal.
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.951451/full

Bakker's review seem to have only one citation which is a review in favor of EFT. Such an unimpactful review makes me doubt of its relevance.