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What many people often fail to understand about leaving an abusive relationship is that it isn't the end of the pain. It’s only the beginning of a new kind of pain, as recovery begins and we start to fully recognize everything we've lost. We also begin to understand what we've gained. Gaining something, however, can be painful too at first because it means something has changed and that we can never go back to the way things once were.
Why won't many psychiatrists listen to patients? Your psychiatrist is supposed to be helping you. Your psychiatrist is supposed to be on your side. You and your psychiatrist are supposed to be a team to fight mental illness together. But this just doesn't always turn out to be true. So many of us have, in fact, experienced the opposite. So why is it that psychiatrists won't listen to patients?
When you live with complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), flashbacks can be one of the most frustrating parts of it. You may go days, weeks, or months without one, then suddenly, bam, you’re hit with a new, frustrating flashback.
Imagine being able to stop worrying and find anxiety relief, even for a moment. Sometimes those moments bring a sense of peace and calm, allowing you to feel happy that your anxious thoughts, feelings, and experiences are leaving you alone. The quiet space is a reminder that, despite how it can seem, the work you're doing to move past anxiety and worries will pay off. In the meantime, there are times when your anxiety may spike and you just need a way to relieve anxiety and stop worrying now, in the moment. Here are 30 little ways to help you find relief when you need it. 
Have you ever noticed how depression can make us feel alone, even when we're surrounded by people? Sometimes it doesn't even matter if the people around us are our closest friends or family members. We may even be talking and laughing; we appear to be having fun, yet, on the inside, our depression has us feeling completely alone. How do we cope when this happens? Are our coping mechanisms always healthy?
Mental health support groups can help you improve your self-esteem. Although there are many different techniques to build self-esteem, from various forms of therapy to self-help exercises, mental health support groups could also play a part. They help because, sometimes, what we really need to build self-esteem is increased connection with others. For people living with low self-esteem, it can sometimes feel like you’re the only one struggling with this problem. But the reality is that many people also live with low self-esteem, whether that’s because of a mental health condition or as a standalone issue.
A few months ago I underwent eye muscle surgery to better align my eyes. This is a problem I have struggled with since birth, so it really gave my confidence a boost to look in the mirror and see straight eyes. The surgery was elective and something I really had to ask for.
This post was particularly difficult for me to write because mental health hospitalization is not easy to talk about thanks to mental health hospitalization stigma. This stigma is profound, and both the stigma and the hospitalization itself places great strain on both the individual requiring treatment and their loved ones. I struggled with what to write, who to write it for, and if I should even post at all. If you know me or have read my page, you will know that I write for HealthyPlace because my husband has a mental illness. He has a diagnosis of schizophrenia. He also writes for HealthyPlace as a coauthor of "Creative Schizophrenia." Since his last hospitalization, we moved halfway across the country, had our third child, bought a house to renovate, found good jobs, and learned to work through his minor relapses. A couple of days ago, his condition deteriorated. He suffered a significant relapse and displayed signs of dealing with a significant psychotic episode. Even though I blog about coping with a family member's mental illness, I dreaded what came next and the response from those around us. As I drove him to the hospital, I felt the sting of stigma over his mental health hospitalization.
You've probably noticed that you feel good when you are kind to others, but did you know that regular acts of kindness change your brain over time? There is a lot of fascinating research out there on the health benefits of kindness. Let's explore how kindness changes the brain, so we can all be kinder, healthier, and happier.
Most mainstream eating disorder films offer stereotypical representations of people with eating disorders. It’s important for our storytellers to start offering honest and responsible portrayals of eating disorders that speak to a wider spectrum of people.

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Comments

Lora Leese
Hi Antoinette... I'm going to see my Dr today at 2...I do have ADHD an Rsd... I'm so overwhelmed when I talk to anybody..even over the cell phone!! I recognize in what your saying I can relate...are you on any meds? An if so are they helping with your Rsd....oh yeah I also wanted to add my Mom wasnt nurturing..I never got told I Love you or felt " safe" ... comfortable...I read articles where they said lack of maternal love could b where it stems from...I get it....I really do...but I feel at this point it's so embedded in me...just like the air that I breathe..I want so bad to let go of it! I no as soon as I step out the door it will show it's ugly little face again!! Any feedback from anyone will be greatly appreciated
George Abitante
Hi Lizanne,

Thanks as always for your kind and thoughtful comment! I hadn't considered that this may be particularly timely advice, but you make a great point that this is an excellent time to be thinking about how we can communicate effectively with family.

George
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Hi Arlin,
Thank you for adding that important question: What did I miss out on because of my safety behavior? That is an excellent way of gauging the help vs. harm a certain action is.
marilyn rowe
hello and thank you for this site....I am about to lose my own mind here. My son is 33 y.o. and has been diagnosed with schizophrenia since 18. At the age of 18 a middle aged man preyed on my son, got him into the gay life style ( he was not gay ) and has taken every dime of his ssi since then..My son contracted hiv while living with this man. 4 years ago my son came back home but still gives this man every penny he gets...the man bouught a house with the money and leads my son in to believing it is his house..makes my son pay utilities, insurance, and taxes. no one lives in it....my eldest son is attempting to purchase the house from this man so his brother can always have a place to live in life but the man is dragging his feet...won't evey give my son the 60,000 he owes him. I am too old to deal with this anymore and I need to let go, I just don't know how....it's killing me...I support my ill son in every way, house, food, transportation, clothing, etc...everything.....i am going to die before him...oh jesus
Laura Barton
Hi Scootee. I really appreciate you taking the time to share your story. I know that's not always an easy thing to do and it definitely sounds like you've had some hardships because of stigma. Recognizing the scope of stigma and how it ripples out can certainly help in our battle against stigma. I think what you bring up at the end is very important: sometimes ignorant people are unreachable. I don't think this means we should give up though. Rather, it's one of the reasons I think we should focus on building ourselves and each other up to be less affected by the stigmatized ideas of other people. I wrote a blog about this sort of thing, titled What if Mental Illness Stigma Never Goes Away? Feel free to check it out here: http://bit.ly/2tk6jCB

I love your drive to tackle stigma in the wake of what you and your parents faced. Keep at it and know you're not alone!