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If you have postpartum depression (PPD), one of your symptoms might be anxiety. Anxiety can be overwhelming and severely interfere with everyday activities. I remember struggling to breathe as my heart raced and my stomach dropped simply because I was going to a community event. But if you're struggling with anxiety related to postpartum depression, there are some coping strategies that can help you get through it.
I have continuously switched back and forth from being medicated to trying life on my own, with varying results due to depression and anxiety from abuse. While some days are better than others, one prominent element in my life has made it clear; psychiatric medication helps me. However, this may not always be the case with some individuals. For many years, doctors prescribed me psychiatric medication that did not help but also worsened my anxiety and depression symptoms. Thankfully, I have found a balance and a workable solution despite my reluctance to take psychiatric medication.
Reading—or better yet, writing—self-harm recovery poems can be a simple, accessible means of coping with difficult feelings around self-injury and the healing process.
I've been drinking an average of two cups of caffeinated coffee a day for decades. This is not a lot by some standards. I relished my first "cup of Joe" in the morning, appreciating the way it got me going. That second cup in the afternoon was the delicious pick-me-up I needed. I always knew that caffeine was a stimulant, but I never quite understood how caffeine affected my anxiety, if at all.
You might count yourself lucky if you have a job, the work is fine, and the pay is decent. But then there is a problem that's hard to ignore: You don't fit in because you are depressed. You feel like the odd one out, the black sheep at work. Here are some things you can do to help yourself.
Mental illness puts thoughts in your head. The fact that mental illness puts thoughts in your head is pretty much the definition of most mental illnesses. If it wasn't for the unhealthy thoughts and feelings that we have, we wouldn't be sick. And just like everyone, we tend to judge our own thoughts and feelings -- even if they're illness-generated. Moreover, the judgment of our own thoughts and feelings often gets translated as a judgment of ourselves. For example, if we judge our thoughts and feelings as unacceptable, then we may feel that we are unacceptable. So, let's take a look at mental illness putting thoughts in our head and how we judge those thoughts.
When I am very stressed out, I tend to watch a lot of quiz shows. This has been a constant in my life since I was very young – I remember watching episodes of Jeopardy when I must have only been two or three years old.
As an infant, I was adopted by two warm and loving parents. They provided me with a wonderful childhood, good morals, a safe home, and a great life. But I faced some issues that my adopted family did not fully understand. Having never met my biological family, I wondered if my mental health challenges were genetic. Last year, I decided to dig into my biological roots and meet my birth family. In this post, I discuss my reasons for starting my journey recently and how finding my biological family has affected my emotional health thus far.
In today’s hustle culture, we pay less attention to work-life balance than perhaps we used to. Instead, we laud entrepreneurs that spend their waking moments putting effort into reaching success. We applaud those who have side gigs and celebrate the tenacity of those that go-go-go for their careers. In those situations, work tips the scales so that life is barely a blip on the radar, and in celebrating them, it suggests that’s what we should all strive for. If not, we’re not doing enough. Consequently, we ignore how tipping the scales of work-life balance leads to burnout and suggest that the state of our mental health doesn’t matter.
Schizophrenia and self-harm aren’t always coupled, but it can be a dangerous situation when they are. For example, triggers from hallucinations can stress you out and make you think self-harm is a good idea. It’s never a solution, but it is often turned to as one. Some studies suggest that one in five females and one in seven males engage in self-harm, and about two million cases are reported each year.

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Comments

Liana M. Scott
Thanks so much. It's been a long recovery process but I'm confident the end of the tunnel is close at hand.
Natasha Tracy
Hi Yvette,

I'm so sorry to hear someone is putting kids in unsafe situations. I can't make any specific recommendations without more information on what those situations look like.

One thing I will say is that if the situations really are unsafe, I might look at changing the custody agreement. Obviously, avoiding unsafe situations is the best idea.

Good luck.

-- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Tim,

There are varying degrees of bipolar disorder severity, yes. Is it possible that a less severe manifestation of bipolar be treated without medication? Maybe. This is very, very rare, however. If you wish to try this, please make sure to do it under the supervision of a psychiatrist.

-- Natasha Tracy
Kathryn
Ellie. I just wanted to see how U r. Stay strong 💪 I am going to connect up to my guides thru angel work and send luv and light to surround U and protect U. Beautiful lady never give up. Kathryn xxx
Lysa
Hi Elizabeth! This is really helpful! Is there a part 3 and 4 for the last 2 levels of hyperactivity? I would love to see what has worked for you, as I am struggling with this in my own life at work. Thanks for these posts!