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When "After Life" first hit Netflix in 2019, I was immediately in love with a show that deals with mental health, and raving about it. Now, three years later, after watching the final season, I’m raving about it all the more. Back then, I wrote about how impressed I was with how the show handles topics like grief and mental health struggles. Now, wiping away my tears thanks to the final episode, I’m here to say we need more shows like "After Life."
Toxic positivity seems to be popping up everywhere on social media. Scrolling through Instagram, I see at least two or three posts a day promoting a view on positivity that may actually be counterintuitive to true happiness. People may ask, "What's the big deal with toxic positivity?" The answer is, in my experience, toxic positivity can do more harm than good in promoting mental health wellness.
As the youngest in a slightly dysfunctional family full of addiction and mental illness, it was no surprise that I would eventually find myself battling those same demons. I grew up surrounded by booze, drugs, and chaos with very little conversation on the seriousness of alcohol abuse and addiction.
Once you suffer from verbal abuse, it can be hard to see a life without it. I have often found myself over-analyzing responses from people trying to decipher if they are genuine or have an underlying harmful intent. It can be challenging to look past the hostile environment that one is accustomed to and see that there are positive people in the world who do not cause harm. 
I have a slight tear in the meniscus of my left knee, and the whole situation stinks. For weeks, I could barely walk. My knee is getting better now, thanks to physical therapy. Not only is the physical therapy making my knee better--and hence making my schizoaffective disorder better--but the fact that I have to drive somewhere in the snow and ice of a Chicago winter twice a week is chipping away at my fear of driving.
It's hard to know when to ask for help—and, for many, the asking is hard, too. But for an issue as serious as self-harm, getting self-help can be a key stepping stone on the path to self-injury recovery.
My name is Robert Vickens and I’m the new author on "Creative Schizophrenia." I’ve been diagnosed with schizophrenia and adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). I know we can achieve great things when we have the proper support and treatment. That is what my writing will focus on, treatment and support.
I remember when I was in college, I had to stop into one of my roommate’s friend's rooms across the hall. When I opened the door, I felt uncomfortable – not because of anything they said or did, but because of what I saw. The room was bare – I don’t remember seeing anything on the wall, shelves, anything. I remember thinking to myself, how could anyone live in a place like this? After that, I went back to my room and just sat for a while, enjoying my familiar environment. It was the first time I realized what I need in terms of that environment – namely, lots of decorations everywhere. I have found that decorations help with anxiety.
So, we're on a journey to build better self-esteem, and you want to know where to begin. Starting out may seem like a daunting task. The best way to tackle it is by breaking it down into smaller steps. Today, we'll cover step one: identifying what makes you, you.
As much as I would rather overlook this step in the healing process, I cannot deny that self-forgiveness is a powerful tool in eating disorder recovery. It pains me right down to my core when I remember just how much I hurt both myself and those I love most in that dark, miserable season of life when my eating disorder had all the control. I take no pleasure in those memories, but I need to forgive myself for them nonetheless.

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Liana M. Scott
Hi Izzy. I totally understand where you're coming from. I have felt similarly in the past. What works best for me is setting boundaries for myself and keeping to those boundaries. I'm honest with myself about how much time I need for my tasks (work, etc.), then myself (very important), then others (family and friends). I'm honest with myself about who I want to spend time with and why. Sure, obligation and respect for family comes into play but I often offset that with more time for myself or a really good/favorite friend. Go easy on yourself. And, take care of you first. Without that, none of the rest is possible.
Dan S
Sorry, but this post Fulton is unbelievable. Making a depression into a conspiracy theory. There is no way that you have experienced depression I have. No one forced me to feel the way I do. But, I’ll “pull myself up by the boot straps” and “suck it up buttercup” and get back to life. I think big-pharma could make a killing with a anti-conspiracy theory drug these.
Kimberly Hattabaugh
Thank you for sharing this. I’ve never thought about this natural way to help alleviate anxiety.
Sarah
Hi there. I used to suffer with this condition since I was a baby until I was about 35 years old. . I didn't know that it could have any connection to being sexually abused? That makes a lot of sense though. Because I was sexually abused since I was a baby until I was about 14 years old. I was so ashamed of my trich I would have bald spots on the sides of my head, as a kid , as a teenager, my twenty's, my thirty's. until I finally stopped at the age of about 35 years old. I have also been diagnosed with schizophrenia. I want to help anyone else that is out there suffering with this. I didn't tell ANYONE when I was younger. I was so scared, I already had problems making friends as it was. I didn't even tell my parents. They knew that something was wrong, but they were they type of family that swept everything under the rug that was traumatic or embarrassing to our family. They just wouldn't talk about it. The most they would say to me was to get my hands out of my hair. So it always felt like I was doing something wrong, and couldn't ask for help. I felt judged, and not accepted in my own family. I suffer with depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, ptsd, and on and on... I'm just so relieved to have stopped pulling my hair. The way I stopped was because of my husband. He was upfront with me about my condition, and just asked me what was going on? So I was honest with him, because I trusted him, and he told, why don't you play with your extensions that you put in your hair? Because after awhile there were extensions at the beauty store that I could afford, and when I put them in my hair, it looked like I had more hair. So I started just holding and playing with them in my hands whenever I felt the urge to pull my hair and it worked! Im telling you after suffering for all those years, Finally after awhile just playing with my extensions in my hands, I now have also stopped playing with the extensions and haven't had any urges to pull my own hair anymore. It's been about 10 years now without any urges. I suggest anyone that's going through this, find a wig, hair extensions, or anything that feels like hair to try it. It might be the answer for this tormenting issue. I have long grown our hair now. The only thing is though what I noticed is I still have hair stuck in the gums of my teeth. It seems as though it's still growing in my gums and teeth. I'm too embarrassed to tell my dentist. My tongue is always trying to feel for the hair in my teeth. I hope I helped someone reading this. I would have loved to have figured this out a long time ago.
Hannah
Thank you for bringing so much value to this community with this blog. It has been such a joy reading your pieces and being able to relate to your journey . You have created a safe space of learning and growth where those of us who struggle with the similar Demons can come to not feel so alone! Thank you for all that you are and sharing about this topic.