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Depression and alcohol have always been interconnected throughout my life. I always felt that I avoided dealing with my mental health issues because it would end the illusion that I was a heavy drinker but not an alcoholic. In addition to questioning whether I was an alcoholic, another subject arose -- Is drinking every day causing my depression, or is my depression the driving force behind it all?
I thought about self-forgiveness recently. I celebrated my birthday towards the end of last month -- and around this time, I heard Miley Cyrus's latest song titled "Used To Be Young." It resonated with me because birthdays make me think of the past and what the future has in store for me. While listening to Miley's beautiful song on repeat, I couldn't help but ask myself: Have I forgiven myself for all the mistakes and failures of my past?
It's so often the case that a doctor won't listen to you. I've had it happen over and over and over again. Some doctors are worse than others, of course, but it feels like they all do it on some level. I know they use their clinical judgment to assess whatever you say in an appointment, but still, it's no fun when a doctor won't listen to you.
I work to cultivate my strengths, as living with a mental health diagnosis can present unique challenges to one's self-esteem and overall wellbeing. I know the internal struggles with stigma, self-doubt, and societal expectations can often overshadow my sense of self-worth. However, there is a powerful approach that can help rebuild and enhance self-esteem: focusing on and cultivating one's strengths.
Did you know there are warning signs of a setback in mental illness recovery? This is important to know because recovering from mental illness is not linear. I've heard that often and for a good reason. It's true; recovery is far from linear. I've faced many obstacles, bumps, and slow-downs in my own journey, and often, I didn't realize that I had begun slipping until I was already in a tough spot. It's easier to catch myself slipping and then change directions than to find myself in these slumps, so I've found it helpful to identify my own warning signs of a setback in mental health recovery.
While suicidality is often driven, at least in part, by lifestyle factors, a person with a good life can still be suicidal. This doesn't make sense to many people. How can someone with an objectively good life feel like they want to die? The answer to that is simple and complex. A person with a good life can be suicidal because of the brain.
Recently, I was concerned that the effects of verbal abuse had damaged me. This revelation came to me after watching "Barbie." The more I talked to others about this film, the more I realized I was one of the few people who didn't cry during the show. Is it because I'm damaged from verbal abuse?
There are innovations in the treatment and prevention of gambling addiction. As a recovering gambling addict, I spend much of my time finding ways to make the journey easier and more fulfilling for myself and others. I also spend significant time looking into ways to avoid falling back into old habits. But, new gambling trends aside, I’m happy to say that technological advancement has brought new treatment and preventative strategies for gambling addicts.
My name is Sean Gunderson, and I am the new author of "Building Self-Esteem." I am optimistic to begin writing for HealthyPlace. I hope that my unique lived experiences, along with my engaging personality, will help make my blog a place that you turn to for ideas and support in your life’s journey. In my own life’s journey, I have come to realize the importance of self-esteem and have learned how to cultivate it effectively.
Psychiatric advance directives are not something people talk about enough. Psychiatric medication has saved my life and helped me to function and participate in events and daily activities that I wouldn't be able to do without it. It also saved my marriage and allowed me to have successful relationships with friends and family. I believe my medication is why I do as well as I do (which isn't always great, but I have joy-filled days and many accomplishments that I can be proud of, given limitations). I want to communicate these things to doctors because medication is necessary for my treatment. I can do this by formulating a psychiatric advance directive.

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Ali
So I said I had memories of everything that has happened throughout my life i meant I remember all my trauma somewhat. I do not remember most of my life. I have some memories as a child, some when I was in elementary school, and most of my memories when I was in middle school, I barely remember stuff that has happened to me in highschool (which is right now) I understand my symptoms could be a whole variety of things not just DID, again I do not think I have DID I just have terrible memory, though one time my mom straightened my hair and I felt like I started acting like a whole different person lol.
Susan
I worry that there is invisible harm to self or others that is caused by the most innocent of actions I take. I feel sure that others will view this bizarre belief as delusional, but it feels real to me. I wish to stop all suffering; both my own and others. Sorry if I'm bad
Sophie
Was about to relapse into SH again after several years sober because of a few academic slipups that made me feel really awful and like I was a waste of space. For someone with quite a logical, rigid way of thinking, having these negative thought patterns challenged and argued in the same way was quite effective in stopping me. Thanks
A💓
dont do it trust me i still have scars from march this year and i hate them so much. theres so many better ways to cope other than self harm please dont do it everytime i look at my arm my heart just sinks i hate my scars so so much and now its summer so i have to wear short sleeves and i hate it. thats kind of it just talk to someone about how youre feeling ur not alone just dont resort to self harm. this is one of the biggest regrets ever.
No name
My girlfriend struggles with mental illness, BPD. She is currently going through a very low low. She’s a stay at home mom with my son (who she met when he was about 1 years old and he’s almost two and a half now). I believe things began getting bad when he reached the more difficult age (terrible two’s). I work a lot and long hours so she’s with him often. By the time I get home, I’m excited to be with them but she’s checked out for the day which affects me, even if I try to not let it. She sees it affects me (her negative mood) and feels guilty for it. I try to explain to her that we are both just struggling with stress and that I’m not upset at her personally but she’s having a very hard time. When I try to talk to her about her hard time, she says I don’t understand and I’m not helping. I’m not sure what I can do to try to understand her mental state because I’m the type to always look at the positive side of things and she looks at the negative sides of things so we have been clashing a lot lately.