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It can be difficult to strike a balance between respecting a family member's right to confidentiality about their diagnosis and recognizing your own need to vent.
Because of bipolar and depression, I have a lack of motivation. Lack of motivation is not technically a symptom of depression according to the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition" ("DSM-5"), but in my experience, it's highly correlated. I must admit, I harshly judge this as being a personal flaw. Here's a look at how depression and a lack of motivation are linked and how a lack of motivation isn't really a personal flaw at all.
It can be hard to talk about a situation that involves verbal abuse. Many victims can be hesitant to share their verbal abuse stories, especially when they are afraid of backlash or gaslighting from others. This reluctance is a barrier that can keep individuals from leaving abuse, healing, and moving forward.
An anxiety flare-up is an unexpected return of anxiety after you thought you had worked through it. Anxiety never fully disappears from anyone's life, but you may have been sailing through your life, unburdened by constant anxious thoughts and feelings and doing things you want to do, when seemingly out of the blue, anxiety jumps into your path and tries to control you again. Despite how it may feel, it's not a sign that you're doomed to a life of high anxiety. When you gain a broader perspective on what an anxiety flare-up is, you can take steps to handle it and move forward again.
I don’t know how many people feel limited by anxiety, but if I were to make a bet, I would say that quite a few people are impacted by the limitations of anxiety. So, I figured a post is recommended. When I am anxious, I find that there are certain things that I am unable to do because they are too mentally taxing. I’m not talking about things that I’m uncomfortable doing anyway – these are things that I love doing, things that I would ordinarily spend a lot of time doing if I wasn’t anxious. This post is about those things.
Hard conversations are, well, hard. Maybe you are avoiding one by waiting for another person to initiate because you don't want to ruin your relationship. Maybe you are avoiding one by convincing yourself that there's nothing to talk about and that issues will magically melt away soon enough. Most of the time, unfortunately, this isn't true. Most of the time, you need to have a difficult conversation.
This post is not necessarily about wrist scars, as self-harm can come in many forms. This is just a reflection on my personal experiences with self-injury in the wrist and forearm area, as that's where I used to hurt myself. I feel most people react to scars similarly, especially if their reaction comes from ignorance or fear rather than love. Therefore, this post might be helpful if you know someone who self-harms and you wonder how to behave around them.
It can be easy to fall into a victim mentality with borderline personality disorder (BPD). You can often feel like your brain is working against you and making life unnecessarily hard. However, treating yourself as a victim can be detrimental and prevent you from recovering and moving on from traumatic events.
I feel as though people like to think about incidents of mental health stigma as little pockets in time, but really, they live beyond the moments they happen. These are not compartmentalized or filed away. We know stigma can have negative impacts on a person, but understanding the depth of those impacts starts with understanding how long that moment of stigma can exist for a person.
The iceberg theory is a frequently cited model of behavior which states that a person's behavior can only be properly understood in the context of the factors that caused it. What a person does is "the tip of the iceberg"-- what we don't see are the emotional, social, cultural, and other factors that lie beneath the surface and cause that behavior.

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Comments

Liana M. Scott
Thanks so much. It's been a long recovery process but I'm confident the end of the tunnel is close at hand.
Natasha Tracy
Hi Yvette,

I'm so sorry to hear someone is putting kids in unsafe situations. I can't make any specific recommendations without more information on what those situations look like.

One thing I will say is that if the situations really are unsafe, I might look at changing the custody agreement. Obviously, avoiding unsafe situations is the best idea.

Good luck.

-- Natasha Tracy
Natasha Tracy
Hi Tim,

There are varying degrees of bipolar disorder severity, yes. Is it possible that a less severe manifestation of bipolar be treated without medication? Maybe. This is very, very rare, however. If you wish to try this, please make sure to do it under the supervision of a psychiatrist.

-- Natasha Tracy
Kathryn
Ellie. I just wanted to see how U r. Stay strong 💪 I am going to connect up to my guides thru angel work and send luv and light to surround U and protect U. Beautiful lady never give up. Kathryn xxx
Lysa
Hi Elizabeth! This is really helpful! Is there a part 3 and 4 for the last 2 levels of hyperactivity? I would love to see what has worked for you, as I am struggling with this in my own life at work. Thanks for these posts!