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Is it mental health stigma? This is a great question to ask ourselves as not everything we encounter is. When we have mental health issues, we can be hypersensitive to any sort of situation that seems to involve our mental health or mental health in general. With this can come the sense that many things are a manifestation of stigma. It's important to recognize, however, that no everything is mental health stigma, even if what we're facing is negative.
I've used many of my articles to share positive takes on anxiety to help my readers relate to their anxiety in a healthier and more productive way. I often bring up the idea that anxiety is part of your body's efforts to keep you safe and thus is not something to be afraid of. Today, however, I wanted to discuss a more concrete aspect of anxiety that I believe can be beneficial when used correctly. Would you believe me if I told you anxiety can be used as a superpower? I would definitely be doubtful, but stick with me another minute and let's see if I can convince you.
You probably think of winter break as a blissful, free, much-needed time to forget about school. Perhaps you binge-watch shows and movies on Netflix, make daily plans to hang out with friends, or enjoy a vacation somewhere warm. This is the picture-perfect winter break. While many students do enjoy these luxuries, this is not the case for everyone. To learn about the different emotions during winter break and tips to cope with them, read this article.
I'm Hollay Ghadery, a new contributer to HealthyPlace's blog "Surviving ED." I don't pretend to have all the answers when it comes to eating disorder (ED) recovery, but I do know that answers are more likely when we bring eating disorders into the light. After all, if we can't see the problems we're working with, we can't make anything better.
New years are filled with new intentions, resolutions, changes, and goals, but 2020 is a little different. This year is a new decade, and it's time to sit down with yourself and set some new intentions with your fresh decade energy and address your verbal abuse experiences.
I've been rereading "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens, and it has occurred to me that depression brings its own ghosts of the past, present, and future. Just as Ebenezer Scrooge had to confront his ghosts, so must we. 
My doctor and I increased my antipsychotic medication twice over the past year—once in September of 2018 and once again this past January. I’ve gained 20 pounds since the initial increase in September. I know I’ve written about weight gain due to medication for my schizoaffective disorder before, but it’s still a problem.
Practicing mental yoga can help reduce anxiety because it builds psychological flexibility. Mental yoga isn't a formal practice with certain poses and movements; instead, it's a way of thinking, feeling, and behaving--a way of being, of living. Just as yoga increases physical flexibility (among other things), mental yoga increases psychological flexibility. As you practice, you can free yourself from anxiety. 
I have been writing for the "Recovering from Mental Illness" blog at HealthyPlace for over two years now. It has been an amazing experience that forced me to really examine my own mental health and what recovery means to me. I am in a better place because of it. I've also gained a lot of confidence as a writer.
If you have dealt with any patterns of disordered eating in your life, chances are these behaviors were—or continue to be—fueled by negative self-talk around body image. Since the brain is a complex, independent, thinking organism, self-talk is an intrinsic part of the human experience. You are hardwired for internal dialog with yourself, and this is not always problematic. That endless stream-of-consciousness in your head is shaped by the beliefs, perspectives, attitudes, and observations that help you negotiate the world around you. When used constructively, self-talk can empower you to confront fears, gain motivation or discipline, boost confidence, and strengthen areas of improvement. But if this self-talk turns critical toward yourself—in particular, how you look or what you weigh—it causes shame to take root and harmful behaviors to manifest which could result in an eating disorder. So it's important to learn how to reframe your negative self-talk around body image into a kinder, more compassionate dialog.

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Emma M
Hi, I'm Emma and I'm a 16 year old girl. My sister keeps hitting me and pushing me nonstop. She also keeps insulting me to a point where I want to die. I don't know what to do about her. What should I do about her?
Marco A. Fontanes
".Hi My name is Marco,
and I have Schizoaffective Disorder and would like for you to pray for a healing. .Thanks and May God bless you?"

Sincerey,

St. Marco
Zaylin
I have a little, i am in highschool, how do i keep her from coming out in a lesson? im not sure how to communicate with her i have no idea how old she might be, and i have another alter who tries to front, but does no work, and doesnt really care. i dont know if i should give her toys and bring them to school? i dont want her getting lost and i dont want the body to start acting like a child.
Jennifer Lear
Hello, Lizanne! Thank you so much for your lovely comment and your warm welcome! You're absolutely right- we really do need more people to come forward and share their stories, and I love the way you put it - "so that it can light the way for others." Thank you so much for your support, and I hope you have a wonderful week!

Tasha
Oh lord that’s me...2 years after making a mistake that hurt someone’s feelings (as a result of trauma inflicted on me by someone else), I cannot forgive myself though they have forgiven me. I am suicidal almost every day in spite of therapy, medication, etc. Hopefully, this will change some day.