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Megan Griffith
Recovering from mental illness is a lot of work all on its own, but lately, those of us in recovery have been handling another major mental health issue: pandemic fatigue. I'm calling pandemic fatigue the sense of weariness and hopelessness that comes from social distancing and missing out on big events as the world battles COVID-19. Lately, pandemic fatigue has been making it much harder for me to focus on my mental health recovery because I've had to go without my usual coping mechanisms for months now.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
It's hard to stay motivated when you are experiencing anxiety. I have goals that I continuously set for myself, but when I'm anxious, it's hard to stay productive and driven to work towards those goals.
Martyna Halas
Explaining your self-harm scars to others can be uncomfortable. Having your self-harm scars discovered is a bit like being outed against your will. Still, the person who confronts you about your self-injury marks will likely want to know what they are. While you don’t owe anyone an explanation, sometimes it’s hard to avoid this conversation. Here are some of the approaches you can take to explain your self-harm scars to others.
Nori Rose Hubert
I don't do so well with bipolar disorder and seasonal changes, especially moving into fall and winter. Yet, October is one of my favorite months. I love anything and everything to do with Halloween, breaking out my boots that have sat neglected in the closet all summer, and anything with the words "pumpkin spice" on the label. But one thing I don't love is how the seasonal daylight changes affect my mood, which has a direct impact on the way I work while living with bipolar disorder.
Kate Beveridge
There are both pros and cons to a borderline personality diagnosis (BPD) diagnosis. On the one hand, a BPD diagnosis can validate your experiences and give you access to necessary resources like therapy or medication. On the other hand, you can fully take on the label of "borderline" and lose yourself in the process.
Nicola Spendlove
Many people aren’t sure whether or not to talk to kids about mental illness. When I was younger my aunt had frequent hospitalizations due to mental health issues, but I was told she had a sore back. I guess my family thought this was an inappropriate topic to talk to a child about. In hindsight, I think it could have been a positive conversation if I had been told about my aunt’s mental illness – here’s why.
Meagon Nolasco
Coping with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a must-have skillset for many in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, etc. (LGBTQIA+) community because PTSD is more prevalent than we think. The possible trauma endured by these LGBTQIA+ survivors is hate crimes, intimate partner violence and sexual assault. Symptoms of PTSD can include flashbacks of the trauma(s) and a fair bit of anxiety when in triggering situations. This is how my PTSD manifests in my own life.
George Abitante
I love getting time to myself in nature because it soothes my anxiety. Whether it's going for a hike, bike ride, or even driving through a forest, finding time in a natural setting away from more populated areas is very soothing and enjoyable for me.
Natasha Tracy
Medication failure is not bad. Don't get me wrong, I know that it feels really, really bad, but just hear me out on this one: even though it feels terrible, a failing medication is not bad.
Mahevash Shaikh
Let's cut to the chase: depression is mentally and physically debilitating. Even if you are do not have low-functioning depression, depression limits what you can and cannot do. To prevent depression from getting worse, one needs to learn to set boundaries. Here's why.

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Comments

Laura A. Barton
You're so welcome. I'm glad my blog was able to help you feel less alone and more seen with this. It's great to hear that you've got methods you're trying to overcome the depressive feelings, and while it can sometimes seem like they're not working, I encourage you to keep at it if you feel like they do help a bit. Or it may be worth exploring other options. Don't forget to take breaks and practice self-care as well so that the toll on your mind is as little as possible. You've got this!
Laura A. Barton
You're definitely not alone! It's a strange feeling when you're happy but also dealing with depression, but it's totally possible. For me, being alone brings it out a lot as well.
Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
Hi Lizanne,

It is such a good point that consistency is key! Taking the time to pause and reflect - and consistently do so - can be such a simple but impactful strategy for dealing with anxiety.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

Hope all is well,
Rizza
Bella
Amazing. Just amazing. You don't understand how many questions this article answers. How can I be the most happy person I know yet at the same time the most empty, numb, and anxious person? Now I know. I always felt very carefree and typically I am... until I get home or alone with my thoughts. I start building up my anxiety (or the people I live with build it up for me) and I end up feeling stuck, trapped, sensitive, and hopeless. Like I can never escape. I've been practicing meditation and affirmations, but its difficult to keep that positive energy around when people bring you down every day. It starts to take a toll on your mind. I know I will live to lead a good impowering life and this article helped my feel more seen and more able to fight the depressing thoughts. Thank you.
Morgan
I thought it was just me... Im always happy. The happiest in my entire friend group. I feel content overall with my life but when im alone or at home with the people i live with, i just feel trapped, stuck, and empty. I had no idea that it was possible to be a happy person with depression.