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Using mindfulness for self-harm is a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) skill. Dialectical behavior therapy is an effective type of treatment used for issues of self-harm. Originally developed to treat borderline personality disorder (BPD), it is currently used to treat a variety of mental illnesses such as eating disorders and chronic depression. Dialectical behavior therapy targets emotion dysregulation to help patients cope with the severity of their distress.
The mainstream culture needs more advocates for eating disorder awareness—and as someone in pursuit of healing for your own life, you could become an advocate.
You'll never know what you're truly capable of until you take risks and push yourself. This applies to everyone -- with or without a mental illness.
Learned helplessness is a psychological concept I’ve been familiar with for a while, but had never, until recently, thought to apply it to anxiety. It is most commonly framed in terms of depression, but as I’ve given it more thought, the concept can very easily be carried over to anxiety and may provide insight as to why it can be so difficult to pick yourself up when things get really bad.
Medication noncompliance in bipolar disorder is generally considered a bad thing -- and it generally is -- but can medication noncompliance ever be a good thing? I would say so, in very limited situations. Read on to see why medication noncompliance in bipolar disorder can occasionally be a good thing.
Assertive communication works well when it comes to my communication styles. I have a history of vacillating between aggressiveness and passivity in relationships. Both of these styles come with their downsides and it's been an arduous journey to find an effective middle ground. Assertive communication is my middle ground.
A quick nap during the day can change your life. Adding a nap into your life may seem impossible unless you’re in primary school, but the results are worth finding a way to make it happen. Read on for three benefits of a short nap. 
My name is Rosie Cappuccino and I’m a writer, an artist, and the new "More than Borderline" blogger here at HealthyPlace. When I was first diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) five years ago, I felt isolated, frightened and confused about what this diagnosis meant for me. When I read up about the condition in books and online, I discovered that BPD is one of the most deeply stigmatized mental health conditions. It felt awful to be misunderstood and stereotyped as manipulative, attention-seeking and untreatable.
Imagine weakening panic attacks and anxiety attacks simply by being nice to yourself, also known as practicing self-compassion. Both panic attacks and anxiety attacks are intense experiences of severe anxiety that effectively paralyze people, trapping them in severe physical, emotional, and cognitive discomfort. These whole-being strikes are disruptive to life and painful to experience. While often severe, meeting panic attacks and anxiety attacks with self-compassion weakens them and lessens their negative effects. 
On most days, I am an individual without debilitating depression; instead, I live with high-functioning depression. But every now and then, there comes a time when depression completely takes over my body and mind. My arms ache and feel limp and my mind fixates on nothing but suicide. That is when I know I am officially too depressed to work and taking a mental health day seems like the best option. 

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Someadvice
Ok. Some bipolar episodes last awhile and communication during this time is futile. All you will get is being pushed away and angry responses. BUT, hang in there say caring words like I'm here, I'm not going anywhere, I care about you... something like that. You will probably get venom back because something takes over a person's mind and maybe they are so irritated they can't say anything nice. Doesn't make it ok but just put it out there and wait it out. She won't be able to make decisions right now. Keep checking in periodically and she my eventually come up for air. At this point treat her like a friend and when she's better you can talk to her normally again. I'm sorry to say but episodes can last for a few months, it's more like cycles and they can occur at certain times of the year, it's different for everyone but some people cycle in early spring and it lasts until may. Yeah and don't take any of it personally, it's not about you it's what is happening to her mind. It's more like a sickness, she could benefit from treatment and medication. I should also add there are different types of bipolar, in Bipolar I I've seen people start using drugs and become very sexually active and manic that way, bipolar II is more irritable, angry and depressed and stuff. If she's got bipolar I you may be in for some real trouble so watch her behavior and see what you are comfortable with. Everyone needs support.
Ghoster
This hurts the ones you love more than being angry with them. It messes with them psychologically and emotionally. It's 100% selfish. I understand wanting to be left alone and needing a lot of space. But to not acknowledge a person for a week or two is wrong. Just one or two messages per week would be ok actually. With depression, trauma, and bipolar it's natural to be comfortable with isolating but to deal with this you should fight against your mind and try to always remember that humans are not made to be alone. If you are isolating it means you should say hey i'm going off the grid for awhile, i need time or something. I've done this and people actually understood. But to go completely off the grid and not tell anyone puts everyone you love in a difficult position and can lead to getting police involved if it goes on for too long. Do yourselves a favor and reach out at least once, fight the demons in your mind with every ounce of energy you have left. you are stronger than you think and people who love you will eventually understand.
Stephanie
My boyfriend and I have been dating for two years. We had, what I thought was an amazing relationship and would frequently talk about our future. I would share my frustrations with him about his anxieties and his lack of understanding but we could always communicate. He recently discovered a mistake on my part which I find trivial and insignificant but he cannot move past it. During our conversation about this (our first real fight), he tells me he has been diagnosed with schizophrenia and he cant handle what is going on. He didnt know if we should continue, he didnt seem to know what to do. He seemed to want to talk everyday but put our relationship on hold. I have some trauma issues and he wanted me to deal with that and then we would reassess our relationship. that arrangement was too hard for me and I decided if I was to take care of myself, I couldn't reopen the wound of not being with him with every text he would send. We arranged to take a 3 month break with no contact but I worry I am not taking care of him.
Lynda
Good afternoon, I have the depressive form of schizoaffective disorder. My psychiatrist prescribed Risperadol years ago to help me get a better sleep. I also fine a very dark room and cool temperatures help. I sleep about 11 hours a night and try to avoid naps, although sometimes I feel exhausted. I also need a CPAP machine. Sleep is so welcome. It is a relief to my frustrating days.
Jennifer Smith
Hello, Cassie. Thank you for your comment. I'm Jennifer, one of the current authors of the Coping With Depression blog. I'm glad you found the poem. I hope it will be a comfort to both you and your niece.